Bareboat Charter Crew Briefing List

Posted by Grant Headifen on May 14, 2010 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Be the First to Comment

We received a lot of interest in the Bareboat Charter Clinic Crew Briefing Check list that we sent out via our mailer earlier in the week. Some additional and excellent tips were sent in by some of you and so we have updated the list. See it now at the bottom of this page:

Yum yum while sailing

Yum yum while sailing

Bareboat chartering is one of the most fun things you can do on this planet. This August we’re leading a fully booked flotilla in Tonga to sail the islands around Vava’u. But next week we thought we’d pop over there to do a reconnaissance trip. So watch out for our video blog report in a few weeks on that.

Each year we invite our Bareboat Charter Master Graduates to join us on a flotilla. While this year is Tonga, next year we’re thinking of some where in the Med. Come join us on that – watch out for the announcement.

One of the things that we find particularly great about our trips is a fully engaged and working crew. With this comes knowledge about leadership and team work, boat systems, dinghy operations, provisioning requirements and just basic bareboating skills by everyone on board. It’s not that everyone should know how to sail but some good knowledge of what to expect before hand makes the trip go smooth with out drama, confusion, injury, or arguments. Everyone invests A LOT of money in a trip like this.

What we’re suggesting is why not make it as fun as possible. So if you haven’t taken the NauticEd Bareboat Charter clinic yet and haven’t sent it onto your crew,  go ahead and do so because the small comparative investment in the clinic by everyone will make the trip seem ten times more fun (and safe). The one tip like walking under the boom side of the boat when going down wind is tooooooo invaluable for your crew.

Bareboat Yacht Charter Clinic

Bareboat Yacht Charter Clinic

In addition to this, if you’re traveling to Greece, Spain or Croatia, you’ll be required to show harbor authorities a VHF endorsement on your Sailing Certificate. When you take and pass the NauticEd Bareboat Charter Clinic, you’ll get that endorsement stamped on your Sailing Certificate.

So go ahead, get started now with the Bareboat Charter Clinic and let NauticEd teach your crew prior to the trip. And while you’re at it, please hit the Like Button on that page to tell your facebook friends that you like this clinic.

Here again is the Bareboat Charter Curriculum

Module 1: Planning and Arriving
1.1 The Types of Charters
1.2 Good Captainship
1.3 Arrival at the Base
1.4 Provisioning
1.5 Freezer and Fridge Management
1.6 Generators
1.7 Fishing
1.8 Kids
1.9 Local Area Familiarization
1.10 VHF Operations

Module 2: Checking out the Boat
2.1 Getting Familiar with the Boat
2.2 The Deck
2.3 Breakdowns
2.4 The Engine
2.5 The Fuel System
2.6 Starting the Engine
2.7 Operating the Engine
2.8 Stopping the Engine
2.9 Plumbing and Tankage
2.10 Seacocks
2.11 Showers
2.12 Heads
2.13 Bilge Pumps
2.14 Galley Stove
2.15 DC Electrical System
2.16 AC Electrical System
2.17 Sails

Module 3: Underway
3.1 Knot Tying School
3.2 Communications
3.3 The Nautical Chart
3.4 GPS
3.5 The Autopilot
3.6 Mooring
3.7 Anchoring
3.8 The Windlass
3.9 Docking
3.10 Seasickness
3.11 The Dinghy
3.12 Briefing the Crew
3.13 Conclusion

Register now at http://www.nauticed.org/courses/view/bareboat-charter

Chronicles of a Sailing Yacht Charter Week in the BVI’s: Day 8

Posted by Grant Headifen on November 2, 2009 under Bareboat Charter | Be the First to Comment

Friday 2nd October 2009

Early to rise in Savannah Bay – and a swim to shore. Again, this morning we spent a few hours on the beach at Savannah bay snorkeling, playing beach bats, and strolling along the 750m long beach.

We then set sail for Spanish town again were we picked up more ice.  We discovered a free wifi service in Spanish town and so a few or us down loaded emails for the weeks work to come.

Inside Spanish Town harbor, I spent about 10 minutes teaching catamaran maneuvering under power techniques to one of the crew who is going to charter a catamaran on a sailing vacation in Corsica in May next year. Under normal circumstances  in Spanish Town Harbor this would be impossible but due to extremely light traffic in the summer months we were able to do this. The biggest difference that he learned was that when maneuvering a Catamaran, you don’t need water flowing over the rudder to gain maneuverability like a monohull. With a catamaran, the slower you go the better. And so the lesson was more about puling the throttles back and using the correct setting of the forward and reverse on the engines and to watch the relative movement of the boat and adjust the throttles to match what you want – always electing to reduce power (if possible) rather than to increase power on the opposing side. For more information on maneuvering a Catamaran under power see the Catamaran Sailing Confidence Clinic.

Additionally – early in November 2009 we’ll be releasing the NauticEd Catamaran Maneuvering Under Power Game. If you’re wanting to learn to sail a catamaran then this is the game for you – it’s fun.

Catamaran Maneuvering Under Power Game

Catamaran Maneuvering Under Power Game

We then exited the marina and set sails for Salt Island, the agreed upon rendezvous point with the other Catamaran Annie K. We had decided to go ashore there and collect some table salt from te salt ponds and enjoy the beach. The wind was cranking perfect at about 15 knots out of the east and so we enjoyed a really nice and fast broad reach to Salt Island.

Unfortunately, upon arrival, Annie K waved us off reporting that the island had been inhabited by absolute pigs with broken glass all over the beach, fire pits everywhere, trash and polluted salt ponds. Almost like people living there did not want others to share in any island beauty and elected instead to spoil it for everyone inclusive of them selves. So – I guess they achieved success in that we did not drop anchor and instead moved over to the easterly neighboring island, Cooper Island.

Cooper Island BVI's

Cooper Island BVI's

Manchioneel Bay Cooper Island is fantastic. Although in low season the restaurant is only open for lunch. However there are lots of mooring buoys there and a really nice little beach. The wind was out of the east and so the conditions were calm and protected.

coconut rugby

coconut rugby

Some of the guys (self inclusive) found a coconut and broke out into a game of modified touch rugby. After about an hour, with a few injuries sustained we all retired back to the boats.

coconut rugby

coconut rugby

coconut rugby

coconut rugby

coconut rugby

coconut rugby

coconut rugby

coconut rugby

We elected to spend the night in Manchioneel Bay because of the short 6 nautical mile sail in the morning back to Road Town.

Sailing Experience Required by Charter Companies

Posted by Grant Headifen on June 6, 2009 under Bareboat Charter | Be the First to Comment

There is a myth that you need a sailing license to charter a boat. Call any charter company outside of Croatia, Greece and Spain (whose governments legally require a certification) and none will insist on a certification. What charter companies want is competence. And they will take competence in lieu of a certification any day. How does anyone define competence? The charter companies define it as total time on the water as master of the vessel which is within 10 feet of the vessel being chartered. They also list yacht ownership, blue water sailing experience, previous charters as master of the vessel, time sailing in the last 5 years, anchoring experience, and experience as crew as important factors in deciding whether or not to release the boat to a potential customer. No question however, they also certainly do put credence into a sailing certification and practical teaching by a professional.

What the charter company does then is look at the combined factors above and then make a decision. They most certainly would not charter a boat to some one who showed up with a Bareboat Charter Certification from any organization or association with just the minimum time required on the water to get the certification with the exception of perhaps the RYA Day Skipper certification – who require a significant amount of sailing experience for the certification.

In addition to the theory side of the certification, what NauticEd provides is easy access to the information you need to be safe. NauticEd also recognizes that you must have the experience to handle situations that arise and thus there is no substitute for time on the water. In addition to that – if you can get practical competence verification from a sailing school then you’re really good to go.

If you don’t have any experience and don’t have access to a boat, then starting out with practical training by a sailing school is the best way to get “helm time”. Then once you’re deemed competent, many schools can charter you a sailboat by the day. After about 20 times out, you’ll be at a point whereby you’re probably feeling pretty comfortable and a sailing vacation destination company would probably charter a boat to you.

In Summary

Good
Documented sailing experience including some of:

  • 20 + outings as master of 30ft (9m) plus vessel
  • anchoring
  • yacht ownership
  • blue water experience
  • crew experience
  • last 5 years experience
  • Mediterranean mooring
  • previous charter experience

Better
Documented sailing experience above and documented education

Best
Documented sailing experience above, documented education, verified practical competence.

When you show up at a charter company with time on the water as master of the vessel and proven education from any certifying body, they’ll be delighted to let you charter their boat. NauticEd recommends that you show up practiced, educated and taught by a professional.

Regarding Education we recommend a minimum of