NauticEd Student sailing experience in the BVI’s

Posted by Grant Headifen on February 8, 2010 under Bareboat Charter | Be the First to Comment

On 2/9/10 4:09 AM, “MICHAEL” wrote:

Hello Grant,
Just returned from our bareboat charter in BVI .We were there for 9 days.It was great,though the wind was light 5-10 knots for the last few days but was 30knots for the first couple ,a little much for us beginers we we did ok.I was glad to have used your site to familiarize myself with some things. There is nothing like hands on .
I will be looking through the site more ofeten as i will like to learn more bareboating secrets about provisioning the boat etc.I hope to do a larger cat next time.we did a 38 footer that was 11 years old ,it had some issues that we know to look for next time like the fridge seal did not seal at all on the hinge side. The dingy davit mounts were soft and the side lifting the stern of the dingy caved in. The dingy motor ran rough and would not rev high enough to plane off,which if i was not on vacation was a easy jetting fix im sure.We will look for a yacht with ice maker ac and generator next time and one without so many toe stubbers to get from room to room. Looks like a 44 footer or larger. Will this be a harder boat to handle?

Michael,

You’ll really enjoy a 44 footer – I’m assuming you’re thinking of the Lagoon 4400. Very nice boat! We’ve chartered a 46 footer before and once you get to a 38 ft catamaran the step up is not that much difference. Just be aware of the momentum that’s all. But be prepared for all the extra room and living space on the back deck.

I’m noting your comments about chartering an older boat. If you’re going on a vacation it’s just better to spend the little extra money and get a nice newer boat.

Have you played the Cat NED sailing game?

You might consider joining us in Tonga at out Post Graduate Sailing Flotilla in August 2010.

Cheers

Grant

NauticEd

Chronicles of a Sailing Yacht Charter Week in the BVI’s: Day 6

Posted by Grant Headifen on October 17, 2009 under Bareboat Charter | Be the First to Comment

Wednesday 30th September 2009

Bath time on a catamaran is pretty easy and fun for the little one. The catamaran galley is so big that there is plenty of room and the sinks are big. Consequently, Alexandra loved this time of day.

Alexandra Loves Her Catamaran Bathtub

Alexandra Loves Her Catamaran Bathtub

The crew set out in the dinghy to explore the rocky coastline and came back quite impressed.  Lee Bay is certainly a nice stop for overnight or an exploring lunch, not with a Northerly or Westerly Swell however.

We then motored through the Cut between Little Camanoe and Great Camanoe through to Marina Cay to meet up with the other Catamaran in our fleet. They had spent the night in the lee of Marina Cay and reported a very flat sea due to it’s protection from Scrub, Camanoe and Beef Islands.

Marina Cay in the BVI's provides a very sheltered mooring

Marina Cay in the BVI's provides a very sheltered mooring

We sent the dinghy ashore to grab a few bags of Ice at Marina Cay and then we moved 4 miles North East over to Great Dog Island were we had lunch and a swim.While waiting for the Ice, Kay tried her hand at maneuvering the Catamaran in amongst the buoys. She did well and got the hang of the dual engines and how maneuverable the catamaran is. NauticEd is currently building a flash interactive Catamaran maneuvering game which should be released by Oct 25th 2009. It will be embedded into the Catamaran Sailing Confidence Course.

Great Dog Island - British Virgin Islands

Great Dog Island - British Virgin Islands

We then moved over to George Dog island where the snorkeling is reported to be great and we were not let down. The BVI parks provide two mooring buoys on the south west of George Dog.

Excellent snorkeling at George Dog in the BVI's

Excellent snorkeling at George Dog in the BVI's

We then snorkeled around the point to the North West of Kitchen point. We’d highly recommend the snorkeling here. There was lots of coral and colored fish. Other boats reported that the snorkeling off Kitchen point was also impressive. Some of the crew also found some impressive rock cliffs to jump off into the sea. If you’re chartering a yacht on a sailing vacation in the BVI’s do not miss The Dogs.

Excellent Snorkelling at George Dog inthe BVI's

Excellent Snorkelling at George Dog inthe BVI's

Jumping from a cliff on George Dog BVI's

Jumping from a cliff on George Dog BVI's

West Dog - The Dogs BVI's

West Dog - The Dogs BVI's

After a very fun day at the Dogs we set sail for Savanna Bay on Virgin Gorda 2 miles South East of The Dogs. Savanna Bay entrance is not too tricky but you must follow the directions in the Cruising Guide as there are several reefs to miss.

Savannah Bay British Virgin Islands is truly awesome

Savannah Bay British Virgin Islands is truly awesome

However, once inside, wow, it’s a spectacular bay with three long beaches and clear water. Again with a swell from the north or North West this would be not advisable because it is completely open to those directions. If the weather conditions are right, Savanna Bay should not be missed. Several thatched shades are set up on the middle beach which is about 500 yards long. You can anchor about 200 yards off shore in about 15 feet of water.

At the end of the day we were rewarded with a stunning sunset. This picture was taken through the lens of sunglasses. Savannah Bay was one of the high lights of our sailing vacation.

Sunset in Savannah Bay

Sunset in Savannah Bay