How to do a Mediterranean Mooring when the wind is nose on

Posted by Director of Education on May 25, 2017 under Bareboat Charter, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

First, what is a Mediterranean Mooring? Well it can be done anywhere but you mostly see it in the Med where it is required that you back the boat up to a (typically) concrete quay. You either anchor out and back the boat up to the wall OR back the boat up to the wall and pick up a mooring line.  Both the anchor or the mooring line help to hold your boat off the concrete wall. Aft dock lines hold your boat’s stern close to the wall. It’s an easy maneuver but you need to practice it.

Mediterranean Mooring when the wind is pushing you into the wall.

This is a slightly tricky one, not quite as difficult as a side wind, but tricky none the less. To simplify, use the technique below.

From our Maneuvering and Docking a Sailboat Under Power course, you know that backing downwind is not the easiest especially in high winds. You need to start out with the stern into the wind and then put into reverse. This gets the boat moving with water washing over the rudder to gain steerage and then turn the boat clockwise (stern to port) so that you are using the propwalk effect. Once the stern is pointing downwind you have to keep the speed up to overcome the propensity of the wind to push the bow down.

If you combine all that with dropping the anchor at exactly the right moment and pay out the anchor rode fast enough so as to not slow down the boat you’ve got a potentially difficult situation where everything has to come together perfectly. Which btw never happens!!!

So the plan is to make this downwind Mediterranean Mooring task simple.

How to do a Mediterranean Mooring Downwind

How to do a Mediterranean Mooring Downwind

(1) Motor the boat to the place where you think the anchor should be. Eventually, for holding power, you will want as much rode out as practically possible. Use boat lengths to judge the distance. If you have 200 feet of rode and a 40-foot boat, then you should drop the anchor 5 boat lengths out (minus 1 foot LOL).

(2) At the place you deem appropriate, drop enough so that the anchor is on the bottom but not a ton on rode sitting on top of itself; just enough to not let the anchor drag as the boat is pushed downwind.

(3) Allow the boat to be pushed downwind towards the slip. The boat bow will naturally face the wind since the anchor is holding the bow windward.

(4) Pay out anchor rode to allow the boat to drift backwards downwind towards the slip.

(5) Use the engine to maneuver the boat slightly as needed.

(6) Toss long aft docklines ashore to helpful hands on the dock. Tie those off and use forward gear propwash against the rudder to push the stern of the boat as needed to position correctly. See the animation below.

(7) When the stern is aligned to the correct slot pay out more rode and use reverse. The anchor-person controls the rate the boat moves backwards.

(8) Continue to tighten the aft docklines until the vessel is 2-3 feet from the quay wall. Synch up on the anchor line tight enough so that no boat wakes can wash the boat up against the quay wall. Monitor for a while.

(9) Run out the plank – now walk the plank ya’ scally wag and enjoy a local cafe.

What we also find is that you won’t be in exactly the right place and you will need to lever your boat sideways, even into wind. Using a dockline and wash over rudder you can push the boat sideways however you want. Watch this animation.

Did you find this useful?

Take our Maneuvering Under Power course – you’ll impress people at the dock and keep the gel coat on your boat.

 

 

How to Spring into a Tight Space on a Dock

Posted by Director of Education on January 27, 2017 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Maneuvering your gorgeous sailboat under power in the marina is one of the more important skills to learn. Wind, current and tight spaces can be very intimidating and not knowing all the tricks can lead to expensive mistakes as well as serious ego damage.

NauticEd‘s new paper book titled “Maneuver and Dock Your Sailboat Under Power” is now available on Amazon for just $9.91. We highly recommend it.

The book is loaded with all the scenarios you will encounter and covers topics such as: momentum, prop walk, tight turns, using spring lines, leaving the dock, returning to the dock, high winds and current, and the elusive Mediterranean Mooring.

We have extracted an excerpt that will help you get into a tight space on a teehead.

Springing On and In

Coming up to a Tee-head is a situation where you need to spring on. The need for accuracy in your maneuver is heightened when the space is tight. Here is an animation of a boat doing this.

Spring on Animation

Spring on Animation

And here are the forces and moment diagrams.

Spring-on Force Diagram

Spring-on Force Diagram

After you make your plan, ensure dock lines are made ready and (very important) that the crew are told exactly which direction to cleat the boat when they get off. In high winds things can go south very quickly. Ensure dock lines are prepared outside of the life-lines. This is a common mistake and a huge time waster at a critical point in the maneuver.

Plan to get the bow of the boat cleated to the dock as shown, and then spring the boat in.

In this exercise to spring in means; once the bow-line is cleated to the dock, you simply turn the wheel away from the dock and apply forward thrust. The water force on the rudder moves the aft of the boat laterally to the dock.

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The innovation that we like in this book is that throughout the book are QR codes as shown in the image above. When reading the book you simply scan the QR code with your phone. The book then comes alive with real animations and video.

NauticEd Maneuvering Under Power Book

NauticEd Maneuvering Under Power Book

Buy NauticEd’s Maneuver and Dock your Sailboat Under Power on Amazon for $9.91

UPDATE: For Now Amazon has sold out of this book – here is the link to get it on Barnes and Noble

View all the NauticEd Sailing Books here

How to get a free boat

Posted by Director of Education on January 17, 2017 under About NauticEd, Maneuvering Under Power, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Boat Sharing Article by Grant Headifen: Director of Education for NauticEd.

So I always get questions like this “How can I get time logged into my logbook when I don’t own a boat?” There are heaps of ways including friend’s boats and yacht clubs and boat share clubs and fractional membership companies. But there is another one that most people miss out on …

Here is how to get a free boat

Preamble: In 2001, I started SailTime – it is a fractional sharing membership program for sailboats. I grew it out to 30 franchises worldwide. We put 160 boats into the fleet in 5 years. It was the fastest growing dealership of boat sales in the word. We put over 3000 members into our program each paying $500-$600 per month for 1/8th access to the boat via a world first boat sharing software program. I sold the company to the franchise owners in 2007. Whence upon I started NauticEd. While operating SailTime, I had found a massively unserved niche in the market – no one was teaching people how to sail using high-tech multimedia courses and quality practical sailing schools all backed by software. No one! And even today – NauticEd is the only high tech sailing education company in the world. But I digress…

The Crux: Now-a-days, I, along with my friend, operate a single Beneteau 373 “Siyagruva” on Lake Travis with friends being our members and helping defray the costs of the boat – I mean why pay for 100% of a boat when most of the time it sits lonely in the water, right? It is a personal use boat – not a school boat.

Last weekend, I was doing the numbers on the boat with my friend and a revelation hit me. While I ran SailTime as a for profit company, he is running the boat as a “defray the costs with minor profit company”. Wow, why doesn’t everyone do this? Well not every one because that wouldn’t work but think about this – for thousands (yes thousands) of years, people have been sharing boats.

So here is a scenario that anyone can consider:

Let’s say you (or you and a friend) have access to $100k (Home equity, stocks etc) (you can buy a nice second hand boat for $100). In this market – that money will cost you about 4% on home equity or $4k per year (tax deductible).

A slip will cost about $600 per month. Insurance will cost about $500 per month and maintenance about $4000 per year. That adds up to about $22k per year or so including the cost of money.

Now if you have 4 members paying $500 per month that is $2000 per month or $24000 per year. That’s a slight profit. If you’re running a for profit business, you can qualify for a lot of tax benefits. Here is a HUGE one – in the USA, check out IRS code section 179 whereby you can depreciate the first 50% of the cost of the equipment in the first year.  So all that Tax you paid last year from your personal job income – can be gained back and used to pay down the $100 k you borrowed. You can adjust all the numbers as you see fit on size and cost of the boat.

So in a sense – after a couple of years, you don’t have a money cost any more and you are making $4000 to say $6000 per year.  Even if you did not get fancy with the tax, you at least have a free boat. Note: be careful with tax and depreciation and personal use of a company asset. Get some good accounting advice on that.

(Note: With depreciation, if you depreciate something to nothing, when you sell it you will need to pay capital gains tax on the sales price of the asset – speak to your accountant. It is no big deal really because you gained the money up front and paid it back at the end.)

How do you get 4 members? Well, that is simple – just put an ad on Craigslist and Facebook. It is completely realistic, at SailTime we sold people on sharing the boat with 7 others at a higher cost. The nicer the boat, the easier is the sale. How do you manage 4 members regarding scheduling time? Whatever you do don’t draw up a rotation schedule – that sucks. It means that everyone gets only 20% of the time on the boat. Instead use a scheduler calendar and we happen to have the best in the world – how do I know? Because I developed it when running SailTime for 6 years. In fact, it is essentially what they use but it is better because I made some improvements to it. When you use scheduling software it means that everyone has access to about 90% of the time on the boat each – it is based on that no one uses the boat for all of their allocation.

Here is a link to our boat scheduling software.

We also have membership agreements that you can use that are available inside the software.

You can even use a check-on check-off form for each member so that you can track maintenance requests and boat condition remotely. Go to www.jotform.com

Our selfish advice …  make sure all your members are at least Skipper Rank Level II (for bigger boats) (Skipper Small Keelboat Level II for smaller boats) on NauticEd so that they are properly trained up. Once I had a potential member call me and say they had Basic Sailing 101 certification – that was not enough. I wanted to make sure that they at least had proper knowledge and proper experience. Having a 101 certification isn’t enough. Skipper Rank Level II means they have passed the NauticEd Skipper and Maneuvering Under Power courses and have sailed at least 25 days with 13 of those being Master of the vessel on a boat greater than 25 feet. For a really nice boat you might require Level III which is 50 days.

Anyway – I’m just sayin – if you want a really nice free boat … It is literally as simple as that.

Oh and here is another way to take advantage of something like this. Call a friend who has a boat and ask them to share it for a monthly fee. They’ll probably appreciate the break on monthly costs.

You’re welcome!

Grant Headifen
Global Director of Education
NauticEd International Sailing Education

NauticEd is the world’s most advanced sailing education and certification company accepted by yacht charter companies worldwide.

Check out all our Sailing Courses and globally accepted sailing certification and resume

Practical Training Course Matrix

Posted by Director of Education on September 19, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Rules of Right of Way, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

With responsible sailing knowledge there is, of course, theory and practical skills to learn and demonstrate.

When you get with your practical instructor, it is highly recommended to complete the appropriate theory courses prior to the practical training. Otherwise, you’ll spend too much time on the basics preventing the instructor from doing their real work which is to get your hands on the helm and the lines. You don’t want the instructor spending valuable on-the-water time explaining who gives way or how the sails create forces. If this is the case, the instructor may not be able to spend the proper amount of time on the practical skills and thus be forced to fail your desired practical competence ability.

Here is the matrix of courses you should complete vs the Practical Competence Ability you are seeking from your instructor. We hope you take this list seriously. It has been designed by professionals to ensure your competence and confidence on the water. Please do your best to complete them PRIOR to your practical training.

MATCH YOUR PRACTICAL COMPETENCE ABILITY WITH THE THEORY COURSES AND RANKS BELOW

  • Captain – All of:
    • Skipper
    • Maneuvering Under Power
    • Coastal Navigation
    • Electronic Navigation
    • Bareboat Charter
    • Anchoring
    • Storm Tactics
    • Weather
    • SailTrim
    • Safety at Sea

Also for Captain requirement, you are required to have been on an extended distance sailing trip of at least 200 miles with one through-the-night sailing whereby you participated in all aspects of navigation, helm, sail trim, life aboard tasks, and watch.

Who Gives Way, Adrift Powerboat or Sailboat under power?

Posted by Director of Education on April 29, 2016 under Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Rules of Right of Way, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

If you like this post, please LIKE it on facebook. Thanks – it helps our waterways be safer.

This is a question in our FREE Navigation Rules Course which covers in-depth the International Rules of Collision at Sea aka ColRegs.

The Powerboat is adrift. Who gives way?

Who gives way

Using our nano forum technology, one of our student’s asked the question.

Q: Please help! In the image, a sailboat has a powerboat (looks like a cabin cruiser) to port, apparently adrift in this example. However, there are no sails deployed on the sailboat. The sentence beneath this picture says the powerboat must give way, making the sailboat the Stand on boat. Why is this the case? Is it because the powerboat has the sailboat to starboard? Is it because the powerboat is adrift? Is the sailboat under power or adrift? This picture is confusing me because it seems the sail boat is also either under power or adrift. It’s certainly not overtaking the powerboat from the rear. Can anyone help with this one?

Here is our answer

A:Powerboat rules apply. The power boat sees the power driven sailboat on its right (sees a red light) and thus must give way. Additional note: adrift is still under power regardless if the engines are on or off. Why is that? Well, how could the sailboat know if the engines on the powerboat are on or off? For consistency of the rules then, adrift IS underpower. Further note: the sailboat even tho stand-on still has the responsibility to not cause a close quarters situation. Thus, let’s say the power boat could not start its engines, then there is no problem because of the sailboat’s continued responsibility. Further note: the student also asks what if the sailboat is adrift. Well, that point is moot because both adrift would not cause a collision. However, even if the wind was pushing the adrift sailboat towards the adrift powerboat, technically both are still underway and the powerboat is still the give-way vessel. Further note:  if the powerboat was at anchor, then it is at anchor no longer underway.

Thanks to Perry G of Oregon for asking the question using our Nano forums “SeaTalk”.

On every page of our sailing courses, there is a SeaTalk button. Use this button to ask and answer a question. In particular, please help the community by answering questions when you see that there are comments or question on the SeaTalk page.

Have you taken our FREE Navigation Rules Course yet? By taking it and sharing it, our waterways become safer.

Someone on this planet must surely know everything. I’m yet to meet him or her however.

Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race

Posted by Director of Education on April 16, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Celestial Navigation, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Rules of Right of Way, Skipper, Storm Tactics, weather | Comments are off for this article

GET TWO FREE SAILING COURSES AND A FREE ELECTRONIC SAILOR’S LOGBOOK
PLUS BE A LUCKY WINNER OF THE NAUTICED CAPTAIN’S EDUCATION BUNDLE

NauticEd International Sailing Education is the proud title sponsor for the May 12th 2016, Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race. Two of NauticEd’s practical sailing schools, Island Sailing Club and Vancouver Sailing Club are a significant part of this title sponsorship and many of their students are participating.

Oregon Offshore 2016 Race

The race, in its 40th year is 193 miles long and begins off the coast of Astoria, Oregon and finishes in the harbor at Victoria, British Columbia.

As part of the education sponsorship, NauticEd is giving away 6 Captain’s Sailing Education Packages to 6 lucky participants. This represents over a $2000 donation to the cause of keeping people save on the water with advanced sailing education. View the contents of the Captains package below. This represents extensive and vital education for all sailors wanting to sail more than 20 miles off shore or over long distances.

All participants are encouraged to create a new account with NauticEd whereby they will receive 2 FREE NauticEd courses, Navigation Rules and Basic Sail Trim and a FREE sailor’s electronic logbook.

Students of Island Sailing Club and Vancouver Sailing Club are encouraged to join in on the race.

WINNERS: If you are a winner of one of the 6 Captain Education Packs, sign up for a free account at www.NauticEd.org/signin then send us an email. Once we verify with the Committee your prize, we will drop the 12 sailing courses into your curriculum. Congratulations!

ALL OTHERS: Set up a free account at NauticEd here Sign in to NauticEd you will automatically be given two free courses and a free sailor’s electronic logbook. You’re Welcome!

Island Sailing Club  Vancouver Sailing Club

 

NauticEd’s iPhone/iPad App

Posted by Director of Education on September 20, 2015 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Celestial Navigation, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Rules of Right of Way, Skipper, Storm Tactics, Videos and photos, weather | Comments are off for this article

We think this is the world’s best sailing App and for good reason.

NEW APP WAS UPDATED ON SEPT 20th 2015

First off, it is free  (that’s good) and second off with that you get NauticEd’s free course on Navigation Rules. Pretty soon we’ll also add NauticEd’s FREE Basic Sail Trim Course.

In addition, any course that you have invested in with NauticEd automatically appears on your App. And to top that off, you can also take your tests for all your courses on the App offline. That’s a big wow!

There is zero reason not to download the App – and imagine if everyone did and took the FREE Navigation Rules Course. You could stop worrying about if the “other guy” heading at you knows the rules or not. So spread the word generously.

Bored in the doctor’s office? Take the Free Rules of the Nautical Road test!

 

 

Download the NauticEd Course and Testing App now

Angular Momentum When Backing into a Slip

Posted by Director of Education on August 24, 2015 under Bareboat Charter, Maneuvering Under Power, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Backing into a slip is indeed an art form. But once you learn it you’ll be proud of it and your crew will be impressed.

If you like this little tidbit of information, LIKE us on facebook – over there ———->

Here is a situation that comes up when needing to make a tight turn into the slip. During the turn, your boat gathers angular momentum. Meaning once it starts the turn it wants to continue the turn and it will ding you into the slip sides, and at a minimum, chip your gorgeous gel coat and develop gnarly scratches.

Watch the animation below.

The best way to experience this is to take the NauticEd Maneuvering Under Power course. It leads you through dozens of real exercises on the water so that you can gain experience perfectly maneuvering your boat.

Don’t look like a dufus in front of everyone. Become an expert for $39 now!

High Wind Docking Maneuvers

Posted by Director of Education on August 22, 2015 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power | Comments are off for this article

How to back your sailboat into a slip with a high cross wind against the direction of propwalk.

If you like this post please like us on facebook over there ——->

Watch this animation. It deals with an extremely high wind situation.

The trouble is that you are wanting to turn the boat against propwalk and you simply can not get the aft of the boat to turn downwind. Wind turning the bow down and propwalk turning the aft up counteract your rudder no matter how fast you go in reverse. The boat will easily turn clockwise but not counterclockwise. So how do you solve this problem with ease?

 

 

What to do next? Next windy day, grab a friend, grab some lunch and a few libations (non-alchy) and head out to the boat. Do all the exercises we prescribe in the Maneuvering Under Power course. But make sure you take the course first.

The Maneuvering Under Power Course is your big money saver. It makes you into an EXPERT at docking. With gel coat on the line, why would you want to be a crappy docker? Learn from the best experts by taking the course now.

The NauticEd Maneuvering and Docking a Sailboat Under Power Course.

 

 

NauticEd Sailing Nano-Forums

Posted by Director of Education on July 29, 2015 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Celestial Navigation, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Rules of Right of Way, Skipper, Storm Tactics, Videos and photos, weather | Comments are off for this article

If you think this is the greatest idea on the planet or at least just a very good one, please like us on facebook.

Posted by Grant Headifen, Global Director of Education – NauticEd.

One of the greatest things I love about my job is the ability to apply the latest technology to the sailing education industry – it is so exciting to be leading the world in this area.

And – today comes as a greatly awaited day for us to announce one of the bigger innovations in not only sailing education but in the entire community of eLearning itself.

I’d like to introduce Nano-Forums!!!!!!!!

Please watch this video and you’ll see why our Sailing Nano-Forum is so innovative and such a benefit to the sailing community at large – You’re Welcome! It represents a MASSIVE investment in technology over the past 6 months. Ummm like really REALLY massive but we think it’s worth it!

We think you will really enjoy it.

Oh and btw since this is new technology to the world and we invented it, we are coining the phrase NANO-FORUM right here right now!

What it ultimately means is that we all now can collectively crowd source information in targeted specific areas and re-use the crowds knowledge for educational drill down topic purposes in a way never been done before.

Just watch the video – you’ll get what we are talking about.

Please engage in the Nano-Forums through out our courses. Look for the SeaTalks button at the top right of every page of the course.

Start by taking the FREE Navigation Rules Course at:

NauticEd FREE Navigation Rules Sailing Course

International Rules for Prevention of Collision at Sea FREE Course

International Rules for Prevention of Collision at Sea FREE Sailing Course