Favorite RYA Sailing Schools in Canada and elsewhere

Posted by Director of Education on February 28, 2017 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

At NauticEd we have our list of Favorite RYA practical sailing training schools and we are sharing it with you here.

RYA Training Center

NauticEd is a provider of the RYA Day Skipper Theory course online to students worldwide. Technically we are called an RYA shore based training school and thus being a provider of the theory, we want to push our students who have passed the RYA Day Skipper course out to quality RYA schools.

We highly Recommend doing practical sailing training at an RYA School. The RYA school can issue the much sort after International Certificate of Competence which is the United Nations created International Sailing License (the ICC).

They can issue the ICC in either of two ways.

(1) A one-day assessment of theory knowledge and practical skills (pretty grueling and you’d better know your theory. We recommend you take and pass the NauticEd RYA Day Skipper Course OR the NauticEd Bareboat Charter Master Bundle of courses. Don’t wing it – you will fail.)

(2) Do the 5-day on-the-water RYA Day Skipper practical course. A prerequisite of this is the NauticEd RYA Day Skipper online theory course. Once you pass the RYA Day Skipper Course, you automatically qualify for the ICC.

We recommend the 5-day course. Why? Because you are guaranteed to enjoy it and learn some tips even if you are an old dog.

Canada

USA

British Virgin Islands

  • Tortola: Sunsail (although not listed on their site, they are an RYA School. Talk to us at NauticEd and we can facilitate the training)

Portugal

Croatia:

New Zealand:

Oh and just FYI, there are 500 RYA Sailing Training Schools worldwide.

With all of these schools, NauticEd can make the arrangements for you and consult with you if you have enough experience to pass the ICC assessment or if you should take the 5-day course. Either way, contact us.

NauticEd Awarded in the top 40 sailing blogs in the world

Posted by Director of Education on February 10, 2017 under About NauticEd | Comments are off for this article

Good news today everyone!

The NauticEd blog has been awarded as being in the top 40 of sailing blogs in the world. Today we are sitting at #13.

Here is the letter from the founder of Feedspot who does this ranking.

###

Hi NauticEd Team,

My name is Anuj Agarwal. I’m Founder of Feedspot.

I would like to personally congratulate you as your blog  NauticEd has been selected by our panelist as one of the Top 40 Sailing Blogs on the web.

See http://blog.feedspot.com/sailing_blogs/

I personally give you a high-five and want to thank you for your contribution to this world. This is the most comprehensive list of  Top 40 Sailing Blogs on the internet and I’m honored to have you as part of this!

Also, you have the honor of displaying the following badge on your blog.

Best,
Anuj

FeedSpot

How to Spring into a Tight Space on a Dock

Posted by Director of Education on January 27, 2017 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Maneuvering your gorgeous sailboat under power in the marina is one of the more important skills to learn. Wind, current and tight spaces can be very intimidating and not knowing all the tricks can lead to expensive mistakes as well as serious ego damage.

NauticEd‘s new paper book titled “Maneuver and Dock Your Sailboat Under Power” is now available on Amazon for just $9.91. We highly recommend it.

The book is loaded with all the scenarios you will encounter and covers topics such as: momentum, prop walk, tight turns, using spring lines, leaving the dock, returning to the dock, high winds and current, and the elusive Mediterranean Mooring.

We have extracted an excerpt that will help you get into a tight space on a teehead.

Springing On and In

Coming up to a Tee-head is a situation where you need to spring on. The need for accuracy in your maneuver is heightened when the space is tight. Here is an animation of a boat doing this.

Spring on Animation

Spring on Animation

And here are the forces and moment diagrams.

Spring-on Force Diagram

Spring-on Force Diagram

After you make your plan, ensure dock lines are made ready and (very important) that the crew are told exactly which direction to cleat the boat when they get off. In high winds things can go south very quickly. Ensure dock lines are prepared outside of the life-lines. This is a common mistake and a huge time waster at a critical point in the maneuver.

Plan to get the bow of the boat cleated to the dock as shown, and then spring the boat in.

In this exercise to spring in means; once the bow-line is cleated to the dock, you simply turn the wheel away from the dock and apply forward thrust. The water force on the rudder moves the aft of the boat laterally to the dock.

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The innovation that we like in this book is that throughout the book are QR codes as shown in the image above. When reading the book you simply scan the QR code with your phone. The book then comes alive with real animations and video.

NauticEd Maneuvering Under Power Book

NauticEd Maneuvering Under Power Book

Buy NauticEd’s Maneuver and Dock your Sailboat Under Power on Amazon for $9.91

UPDATE: For Now Amazon has sold out of this book – here is the link to get it on Barnes and Noble

View all the NauticEd Sailing Books here

Bareboat Yacht Charter – Tonga or Tahiti?

Posted by Director of Education on January 23, 2017 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

One of our NauticEd students (Doug) called us today asking where to go on a sailing vacation. In particular, he was asking about Tonga or Tahiti. He had been to the Caribbean plenty of times and was looking for something a little different. He’d heard that we were pretty knowledgeable on this.

Doug was right – we’ve been to both locations and have plenty of advice. So here is a summary of our conversation.

Both places provide completely different experience.

First Tonga: Tonga, located 250 miles East of Fiji and 1200 miles NNE of New Zealand, in the pacific, is a wonderful remote experience. The Island you go to for sailing is Vava’ u which is its own archipelago about 150 miles north of the main Tonga capital island of Tongatapu. The yacht charter fleets in Vava’u are small and so there are not many yachts around. Most of the yachts there are world cruisers.

Where Is Tonga

Where Is Tonga

The islands themselves are mostly uninhabited. So your experience is mostly to yourselves and a few whale watching tourists. There is no reprovisioning in the islands so you have to stock up before you head out, but everything is pretty close so, to drop back mid week is not a biggy.

Tonga Beach

The islands are low-lying and close together so there are no great sailing distances you need to do in a day. Rather the days are more spent with a few hours of sailing then exploring, snorkeling and relaxing on the beaches.

Niki Beach

Niki Beach

Navigating is not hard but you will be a little challenged. With no distinguishing land features on each island, it is difficult to easily point at an island and immediately know what it is – you have to follow along on the chart as you go. Of course, GPS is the savior of this but you always need to monitor where you are because the reefs are numerous. GPS can be up to 100 feet (30 meters) off from reality so give everything a wide berth. There is about a 6 ft (2 meters) tide. This is usually not an issue except for one lagoon inside Hunga Island whereby you must only enter which has to be done 2 hours either side of high tide.

Hunga Island Entrance

Hunga Island Entrance

Marina’s Cave is a must. The entrance is underwater about 10 feet down and the swim is about 30 feet long under the water to the cave to come up in an air pocket. Easy but… not for the faint at heart. At certain lighting conditions, it is pretty spectacular inside. When there is a swell, the pressurizing and de-pressurizing of the cave causes a mist and de-mist oscillating condition inside – freaky.

 

Marinas Cave

Marinas Cave

The humpback whales start arriving around the Vava’u islands late June and early July and there are plenty among the islands by mid-July and into August.

Snorkeling is awesome, as the coral is untouched by pollution or over diving.

 Best coral ever

Best coral ever

The sail over to Kenutu island to the east of the archipelago was through a very difficult patch of reef. But it was worth it to take a hike on the island and see the pacific waves crashing into the island wall.

Kenutu Waves

Kenutu Waves

Plan on a week minimum but a 10 day charter is recommended. There is plenty to do and see and in just one week we ran out of time trying to see it all.

The Tongan people are overly friendly and welcoming. Some of the Villages will put on a Luau if you give advance notice which can be done through the sailing base manager.

The Charter base in Vava’u is Moorings/Sunsail and in operated by my friend Shane Walker – a fellow Kiwi. Shane is a great guy and also runs the local resort there called Tongan Beach Resort. Stay there for a few nights either side of your charter.

Getting there is easy(ish). Fiji Airways now go direct from Fiji to Vava’u twice per week.

Overall – a bareboat yacht charter sailing vacation in Vava’u, Tonga is not to be missed in this lifetime. It is one of the more remote places you can go.

NauticEd staff can book this trip for you and give you advice on the kind of sailing/navigation experience you need. Make an inquiry on this page.

Tahiti: 1200 miles further east of Tonga is French Polynesia, known by many as Tahiti which is the main island of the entire French Polynesia archipelago. The sailing area is more done out of the island of Raiatea. So you fly into Pape’ete (on Tahiti Island) from where ever and then take a puddle jumper 300 miles NW to Raiatea.

French Polynesia

French Polynesia

With a weeklong sailing venture, you’ll spend 1/2 of the time around Raiatea and the island of Tahaa, a few miles to the north. Both of which lie in the same giant Lagoon area. Then the rest of time you’ll probably pop 20 miles north west over to the famous Bora Bora and the stunning Lagoon surrounding the awe inspiring volcano of Bora Bora.

Bora Bora

Bora Bora

An absolute highlight on Bora Bora was the Coral River. It is a place where the water flows into the Lagoon through the reef. You jump in and float through the reef checking out the most colorful fish and coral you have ever seen. You end up inside the Lagoon then run back along the path to do it all over again.

Coral River Bora Bora

Coral River Bora Bora

But, anywhere throughout the entire week, you will experience many snorkeling spots where the coral and fish are spectacular.

Navigation is easy – but you need to keep constant watch on where you are. Coral reefs come from 80 feet deep up to 3 feet in a wall. You can easily run aground.

Dangerous Reefs

Dangerous Reefs

French Polynesia, like most of the world, uses Cardinal Marks for indicating safe water.

West Cardinal Mark

West Cardinal Mark
(Safe Water to the West)

 

But also the locals use sticks to indicate not so safe water.

Sticks As Navigation Marks

Sticks As Navigation Marks

The sail from Tahaa to Bora Bora is easy and the volcano of Bora Bora becomes really impressive as you close in on it. The Lagoon around Bora Bora produces the most gorgeous water colors. Obviously there are a ton of really nice resorts and restaurants to stop at.

Tahiti bungalows

Tahiti bungalows

Getting there is easy. There are daily flights to Papeete and onto Raiatea.

In Tahiti, we chartered with Dream Yacht Charter. Overall, the Tahiti experience is also not to be missed in this lifetime. Here is another blog on sailing in Tahiti/French Polynesia

Doug, our student, was asking which one? Which one? Tahiti or Tonga? He has two older teenagers he wants to take. So my answer was both, one trip this year and one next. Bora Bora has brand bragging rights in terms of brand because everyone wants to go to Bora Bora, but for showing teenages a place on this planet that is vastly untouched, I suggested the Kingdom of Tonga first.

NauticEd are agents for both Tahiti and Tonga yacht charter locations as well as most other sailing destinations world wide.

Make an inquiry on this page.

NauticEd is the world’s more advanced sailing education and certification company. Yacht charter companies worldwide accept the NauticEd Bareboat Charter Master Resume and Certification. We specialize in helping people realize their sailing vacation dreams. You can do it!

Get started with two free sailing courses now

How to get a free boat

Posted by Director of Education on January 17, 2017 under About NauticEd, Maneuvering Under Power, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Boat Sharing Article by Grant Headifen: Director of Education for NauticEd.

So I always get questions like this “How can I get time logged into my logbook when I don’t own a boat?” There are heaps of ways including friend’s boats and yacht clubs and boat share clubs and fractional membership companies. But there is another one that most people miss out on …

Here is how to get a free boat

Preamble: In 2001, I started SailTime – it is a fractional sharing membership program for sailboats. I grew it out to 30 franchises worldwide. We put 160 boats into the fleet in 5 years. It was the fastest growing dealership of boat sales in the word. We put over 3000 members into our program each paying $500-$600 per month for 1/8th access to the boat via a world first boat sharing software program. I sold the company to the franchise owners in 2007. Whence upon I started NauticEd. While operating SailTime, I had found a massively unserved niche in the market – no one was teaching people how to sail using high-tech multimedia courses and quality practical sailing schools all backed by software. No one! And even today – NauticEd is the only high tech sailing education company in the world. But I digress…

The Crux: Now-a-days, I, along with my friend, operate a single Beneteau 373 “Siyagruva” on Lake Travis with friends being our members and helping defray the costs of the boat – I mean why pay for 100% of a boat when most of the time it sits lonely in the water, right? It is a personal use boat – not a school boat.

Last weekend, I was doing the numbers on the boat with my friend and a revelation hit me. While I ran SailTime as a for profit company, he is running the boat as a “defray the costs with minor profit company”. Wow, why doesn’t everyone do this? Well not every one because that wouldn’t work but think about this – for thousands (yes thousands) of years, people have been sharing boats.

So here is a scenario that anyone can consider:

Let’s say you (or you and a friend) have access to $100k (Home equity, stocks etc) (you can buy a nice second hand boat for $100). In this market – that money will cost you about 4% on home equity or $4k per year (tax deductible).

A slip will cost about $600 per month. Insurance will cost about $500 per month and maintenance about $4000 per year. That adds up to about $22k per year or so including the cost of money.

Now if you have 4 members paying $500 per month that is $2000 per month or $24000 per year. That’s a slight profit. If you’re running a for profit business, you can qualify for a lot of tax benefits. Here is a HUGE one – in the USA, check out IRS code section 179 whereby you can depreciate the first 50% of the cost of the equipment in the first year.  So all that Tax you paid last year from your personal job income – can be gained back and used to pay down the $100 k you borrowed. You can adjust all the numbers as you see fit on size and cost of the boat.

So in a sense – after a couple of years, you don’t have a money cost any more and you are making $4000 to say $6000 per year.  Even if you did not get fancy with the tax, you at least have a free boat. Note: be careful with tax and depreciation and personal use of a company asset. Get some good accounting advice on that.

(Note: With depreciation, if you depreciate something to nothing, when you sell it you will need to pay capital gains tax on the sales price of the asset – speak to your accountant. It is no big deal really because you gained the money up front and paid it back at the end.)

How do you get 4 members? Well, that is simple – just put an ad on Craigslist and Facebook. It is completely realistic, at SailTime we sold people on sharing the boat with 7 others at a higher cost. The nicer the boat, the easier is the sale. How do you manage 4 members regarding scheduling time? Whatever you do don’t draw up a rotation schedule – that sucks. It means that everyone gets only 20% of the time on the boat. Instead use a scheduler calendar and we happen to have the best in the world – how do I know? Because I developed it when running SailTime for 6 years. In fact, it is essentially what they use but it is better because I made some improvements to it. When you use scheduling software it means that everyone has access to about 90% of the time on the boat each – it is based on that no one uses the boat for all of their allocation.

Here is a link to our boat scheduling software.

We also have membership agreements that you can use that are available inside the software.

You can even use a check-on check-off form for each member so that you can track maintenance requests and boat condition remotely. Go to www.jotform.com

Our selfish advice …  make sure all your members are at least Skipper Rank Level II (for bigger boats) (Skipper Small Keelboat Level II for smaller boats) on NauticEd so that they are properly trained up. Once I had a potential member call me and say they had Basic Sailing 101 certification – that was not enough. I wanted to make sure that they at least had proper knowledge and proper experience. Having a 101 certification isn’t enough. Skipper Rank Level II means they have passed the NauticEd Skipper and Maneuvering Under Power courses and have sailed at least 25 days with 13 of those being Master of the vessel on a boat greater than 25 feet. For a really nice boat you might require Level III which is 50 days.

Anyway – I’m just sayin – if you want a really nice free boat … It is literally as simple as that.

Oh and here is another way to take advantage of something like this. Call a friend who has a boat and ask them to share it for a monthly fee. They’ll probably appreciate the break on monthly costs.

You’re welcome!

Grant Headifen
Global Director of Education
NauticEd International Sailing Education

NauticEd is the world’s most advanced sailing education and certification company accepted by yacht charter companies worldwide.

Check out all our Sailing Courses and globally accepted sailing certification and resume

Sailing Vector Game

Posted by Director of Education on December 13, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Rules of Right of Way, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Learn Sailboat Giveway Rules and Cure Boredom at the Same Time.

Here is a fun sailing game you can play ol’ school like when stuck on an airplane with a sailing buddy. It’s kinda like the old Race Car Vector Grid game but better ’cause it’s sailing. If you can drag your kids off the iPad, give it a go with them as well.

If you like this game LIKE it over there —>

Sailing Vector Game

 

Here is an example of a basic course layout.

Sailing Vector Game grid example course

And here is a blank sheet to create your own courses

Sailing Vector Game grid blank

Take a piece of Math Grid Paper. At the bottom left draw a horizontal start line approx. 6 squares across.

Draw the wind direction directly down the page. Lay out a course. For example, first buoy to windward, then second buoy across the page to the right, then 3rd buoy to leeward close to the bottom right of the page then back to first buoy then back through the start finish gate. Label the buoys Port or Starboard meaning the side of the boat all boats must leave the buoy to when rounding. Draw in some menacing islands.

Here is an example of a game played which takes about 20 minutes.

Sailing Vector Game play

A game played

Playing the Game

Read the rules through a few times. You’ll start to get it after a while. Pay particular attention to allowable maneuvers and giveway rules.

Maneuvering

  • Boats move by vectors in the grid denoted as Upwind and Downwind and or across wind on Starboard or across wind on Port.
  • Upwind is listed as U, downwind is listed as D. Across wind is listed as S(starboard) or P (port). E.g 1U:2S means the boat moves 1 square towards the wind and 2 squares to the left (boat on starboard)
  • Boats can only maneuver by increasing or decreasing the previous vector by maximum of 1 in only 1 of the Upwind/Downwind or Port/Starboard directions. However, if both vectors equal then the boat can accelerate or decelerate by 1 up AND by 1 cross.
  • At anytime the minimum move will be at least 1 square.
  • Loose two turns for repairs if you hit an island or go off the board.

Upwind and Tacking Maneuvers

  • Boats can not move more than 45 deg into the wind i.e. the Up vector number can not be more than the cross wind vector number.
  • A boat can tack through the wind at anytime. When the boat tacks the next starting vector is 1U:1(S or P)

Upwind and tacking examples:

1U:1S can accelerate to 2U:2S then to 3U:3S then to 4U:4S
2U:2S can decelerate to 1U:1S
2U:2S can turn to 1U:2S or 2U:3S
3U:3S can tack to 1U:1P
1U:1S tacks to 1U:1P
0U:3S tacks to 1U:1P
5D:3P tacks to 1U:1S
2U:1S is invalid because it is too close to the wind i.e upwind vector is greater than crosswind vector

Downwind and gybing maneuvers

  • A boat can go in any downwind direction, but the down vector can not be more than 3 greater than the cross vector because of reduced apparent wind. i.e. 3D:0S, 4D:1P, 5D:2P are valid whereas 4D:0S, 5D:1S are not valid
  • A boat can gybe between S and P but each time it will loose speed by 1 in each direction. i.e. 3D:3S gybe goes to 2D:2P on the opposite tack setting. If the crosswind vector is 1, then it remains at 1 on the other gybe setting. e.g. 3D:1S gybe results in 2D1P
  • When going directly downwind i.e. 0(S orP) a gybe reduces the downwind by 1 but the 0 across remains 0. Thus, a gybe from 3D:0S will go to 2D:0P
  • When on a beam reach e.g. 0D:3P a gybe causes the boat to decelerate 1 in the cross direction but angles downwind by 1. e.g. 0D:3P gybes to 1D:2S
  • 1D:1S gybes to 1D:1P and vice versa

Downwind and gybing examples:

4D:1S gybe goes to 3D:1P
5D:2S gybe goes to 4D:1P
3D:0S gybe goes to 2D:0P
4D:1S can slow to 3D:1S
4D:1S can not accelerate to 5D:1S
0D:3S gybe goes to 1D:2S
3U:3S gybe goes to 2D:2P
1U:1S gybe goes to 1D:1P

Starting

  • Players start anywhere they select but 1 square downwind from the start line
  • Players can not be on or pass the start line until after their 4th turn
  • A Players first move is either 1S or 1P
  • No violation of the giveway rules prior to start

Giveway Rules:

  • A boat on Port can not come close abeam or forward of another boat’s position on starboard at anytime during its maneuver. Close is defined by all positions 1(U or D)1:1(S or P) relative to the starboard boat’s position that are abeam or forward.
  • When on the same tack, a windward boat can not land on any possible position of the leeward’s boat next landing position.
  • A Port boat can not land on any possible position of a starboard’s boat next landing position.
  • No boat can make a maneuver to force another boat to leave the page.
  • No boat may land on another boat’s current position.

Have Fun!

Sailing Virgins in the BVI joins NauticEd

Posted by Director of Education on December 9, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

NauticEd Finds Sailing Virgins Sailing School

Only ten years ago America’s Cup contenders achieved around 13 knots boat speed. Now they are achieving close to 45 knots – in just ten years! Sailors in such a competition used to wear deck vests. Now they need body armor. Sailing is changing, fast.

Sailing Virgins is a sailing school born in this new environment: cool, fun, fast, and highly professional. With its core market of 20-40 year old adventurous professionals, the Sailing Virgins group quickly realized they would require a learning platform that suited the demanding lifestyles of people who don’t have a lot of free time and EXPECT 21st century cloud-based and App-based eLearning.

That’s why NauticEd and Sailing Virgins Work Well Together

As soon as a Sailing Virgins client signs up for a course, they are given online access to the NauticEd courses and can begin the theory component. No books; everything web and app based.

Then when students arrive at the Tortola, British Virgin Islands-based sailing school, they get straight on the boat and start sailing using their theory knowledge they have already gained (and passed the tests). Thus, exam day, which normally takes out most of a precious sailing day, is no longer a thing.  When in the BVI it’s all about sailing – gaining confidence and competence (and a fair bit of partying).

Courses are one week in duration, starting on a Sunday morning and finishing on a Saturday at lunchtime. There are three streams; Awesome Crew (for people who are figuring out the basics), Bareboat Charter Master (for people who want to charter their own boats) and Advanced Coastal (for people wishing to do longer sails and work in the industry). The calendar of courses is shown here (https://sailingvirgins.com/calendar-20162017/)

What does a typical day look like for a student in this Tortola, BVI Sailing School?

Waking up in a bay, a pre-breakfast swim off the back of the boat is a good idea. Then it’s coffee, breakfast, and a talk about the day. The instructor, using teaching methods refined in aviation training, has a mandate to balance professional teaching methods with keeping things fun.

What about the instructors?

All Sailing Virgins instructors have done time either skippering, route managing and/or instructing for sailing phenomenon The Yacht Week. They are fun, young, smart, professional, and hand selected. They have instructor certifications from the most revered sailing associations in the world. They can’t help but bring a little of the Yacht Week spirit into their courses. What they are definitely NOT are crusty ol’ sailors with a bearded boat. 

How do you get there?

What is the best way to reach the Virgin Islands? In Canada and the US there are direct flights from major east coast cities to St Thomas (STT). These include Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Miami, New York, Newark and Philadelphia. Other US cities (including Los Angeles and other west coast cities) can typically reach St Thomas with one connection.

From St Thomas it is an easy one hour ferry to West End, Tortola. Then you have arrived in the home of Sailing Virgins. Their base, at the Fish n Lime, is literally a walk from the ferry terminal. The Fish n Lime also has accommodation for anyone wishing to spend time before and after their course on land.

Next steps

If you would like to know more about the courses offered by Sailing Virgins, click here. For a free e-book from them titled “How To Become A Professional Skipper” click here.

Welcome on board Sailing Virgins to the NauticEd Platform – your clients are going to love the whole experience.

Set and Drift or Direction and Rate Problem

Posted by Director of Education on December 6, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Just for practice – solve the following problem on the Long Island Sound Chart. This is the chart that we use in the NauticEd Coastal Navigation Course.

 

At 2245 your GPS fixes your position at LAT 41 deg 01.75′ N and LONG 72 deg 48.40′ W. You are steering course 086 deg psc at a speed of 6.0 knots. At 2400 you fix your position at LAT 41 deg 04.2′ N and LONG 72 deg 38.85′ W. What were your set and drift?

Use the following
(1) Here is a pdf of the chart for you to work on
(2) On the chart, the variation is 14 deg W
(3) Since the problem says psc (per ships compass) we need to account of the ships compass deviation. In the NauticEd Coastal Navigation course exercises we used the following table.

 

Ships Compass Deviation Table

HDG MAG DEV HDG MAG DEV HDG MAG DEV
000° 2.0°E 120° 1.0°E 240° 3.0°W
030° 3.0°E 150° 1.0°W 270° 1.5°W
060° 4.0°E 180° 2.0°W 300° 0.0°
090° 2.0°E 210° 3.5°W 330° 1.5°E

Ans:

Set up the TVMDC table

T 074
V 14W
M 088
D  2E
C 086

Thus, your True heading on the chart is 074 deg T. Your water speed along this line is as given is 6 knots.

The time difference is 1 hour and 15 minutes = 1.25 hours. Thus in 1 hour and 15 minutes, you would travel 7.5 nautical miles.

Scribe a line 7.5 nm from the origin along 074 deg T line. This is your water position. The ground position is described by the GPS coords. Draw a line from your water position to the ground position. This is your 1.25 hour long current vector. It is headed due north and is 0.5 nm long. Since this happened in 1.25 hours the current speed is .5/1.25 = 0.4 nm/hr (knots).

Thus:

  • Set (or Direction) is 0 deg T
  • Drift (or Rate) is 0.4 knots

Note: Current is always expressed in deg True and always expressed in the direction it is heading whereas wind is expressed as where it comes from. Note and remember the difference – important.

No Cheating – do the problem first – here is the answer plot

Here is the real answer plot.

Sailing in the British Virgin Islands for 10 days – day 1

Posted by Director of Education on October 3, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

This is the start to a 10-day blog series sailing on a Lagoon 450 with the yacht charter company BVI Yacht Charters based in Road Town, British Virgin Islands.

The Indians, arh the Indians – my favorite. If you miss the Indians you have missed the BVI. It is an integral part of any trip here. It is a staple of the snorkeling diet – an appetizer of what is to come for the week. We just finished an hour with the head pointed down in colorful wonderment. Wow. (Click the Arrows for a slide show)

The Indians are generally the first stop on a BVI roundabout. They are 5 miles Southwest of Road Town. So your first sail is easy. Pop the main and the jib and an hour and a bit later you’re there.

While I’m writing this we’re parked up in The Bight in Norman Island.

The Bight Norman Island

The Bight Norman Island

 

The Bight, Norman Island

The Bight, Norman Island

The day started as an awakening blur of yesterday’s travel. Not bad – 12 hours door to door from Austin, Tx to Miami to Saint Thomas,  USVI. Then a haul ass to the ferry to catch the 3:30 ferry from Charlotte Amalie, USVI to Road Town, Tortolla. The last ferry was at 4:30 which coincided with catching BVI Customs closing at 6:00. Whew –  basically seamless travel just a lot depends on things being on time which are out of your control like airlines.

At the end of it all, you sit back with a drink and say – Hey we’re on Island time, what does it matter? Stress has been banned from the Virgin Islands so you have leave your corporate training at home.

BVI Yacht Charters are located close to downtown Road Town – a really short taxi ride from the ferry terminal. Very convenient. And even more convenient, close to two Grocery stores RiteWay and OneMart. Most of the stuff you can order online through their websites and have delivered directly to your boat before you arrive. For the remaining items,  you can take a short stroll to the store with a cold beer in hand.

Road Town BVI

Road Town BVI

Tony from BVIYC gave us our boat check out briefing this morning and after signing my life away, as usual, we were ready to head out. We were exempted from the chart briefing because … well… I did write the book on it. I had to laugh with Kirstie in the office when she said “I know you wrote the book on it but have you been here before”. She was right to ask – any area you go sailing, you need a familiarity with the area for two reasons: (1) to make sure you have a good time and take advantage of all there is to offer, and more importantly,  (2) to make sure you know where all the dangerous stuff is. The NauticEd BVI Chart Briefing book and associated test is a comprehensive guide to sailing in the BVI. Those that have taken the test and passed it are able to skip the chart briefing and speed up the check-in process. In addition, it means you have all that information on hand.

I must say that the BVI check out crew were so efficient and awesome. The boat was immaculate and ready to go. They even lent us an audio jack cord for plugging in from the stereo to our iPhones (haa haa – everyone on our boat figured that each other would bring that cable – not one between all of us – don’t ever forget to bring a 3.5 mm audio jack to play your tunes.)

So, after a crew safety briefing, we released the dock lines and headed out. Yay. A short sail to Norman Island and my fav. the Indians.

For now, we are listening to a little Lyle Lovette in Pirates Bight, Norman Island. I hear some laughter on the front deck – I’m heading that way.

On shore in the Pirates Bight are two restaurants. Both are very (very) nice. Take a recently emptied credit card. But the experience and the beach is worth a visit at least.

On shore at Pirates Bight

On shore at Pirates Bight

At Willie T’s there is a universal singularity point. The laws of the universe are just different. What you think should apply, doesn’t. After drinks on the front deck of our boat, we moved to Willie T’s to observe this anomaly. But that is my point – soon observation turns into participation. If you can resist, the two things to try to avoid are: (1) the ski shots.  This consists of a water ski with 4 shot glass holes drilled into the ski. When it comes off the ceiling 4 souls are drawn seemingly by magic to put their lips to a shots glass and the ski tips back on its own volition with the smooth liquid pouring down warm throats; (2) Rafter swinging –  these do not end well. Assuming you’ve been working out at the gym, the challenge is to swing hand over hand along the steel rafters. The problem is that the rafters are rusty and all four crew members who tried and completed it (including one of our better-looking crew members) ended leaving the boat with less skin than they started with including yours truly. But at least the gym work paid off with a success grade in the swing. Skin was traded for self-esteem.

Willie T's Universal Singularity

Willie T’s. A Universal Singularity

And, in case you don’t know about Willie T’s – William T. Thornton was the architect who designed the U.S. White House. His boat was purchased and permanently anchored in Pirates Bight. It is now a floating bar with a dinghy dock. They serve some food but the main focus is the bar. It is not really a family place if you get my points from above.

Nighty Night. See you on Day 2!

NauticEd and its expert team are global brokers for the best sailing vacations. We’ve been just about everywhere and know the best spots. We can arrange the best boats and the best prices. In particular, if you want to go to the BVI, we are absolute experts.

If you’re unsure about your competence, well we are the absolute best in the world to bring you up to a proper and safe level of knowledge, skills, education, and globally accepted certifications.

Contact us about an awesome sailing vacation through this page.

Sailing in the British Virgin Islands for 10 days – day 2

Posted by Director of Education on under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

This is Day 2 of our sailing trip in the British Virgin Islands with BVI Yacht Charters on a Lagoon 450.

Needing a little hair of the dog from Willie T’s, the crew elected to sail to Jost Van Dyke island for our next stop over in White Bay where the famous Soggy Dollar bar serves the most delicious Pain Killers and other concoctions. My favorite however, is the Vanilla Killer and our bartender Sana serves them with a great smile. She has worked at the Soggy Dollar for 11 years.

Sana at the Soggy Dollar will take care of you

Sana at the Soggy Dollar will take care of you

The beach at White Bay is one of the more awesome beaches in the BVI. It is not to be missed. There are also several other restaurants and bars along the beach. Just be aware to leave the beach prior to dusk. No See’ems come out and will eat your legs off. Otherwise, during the day there are no bities.


There are two entrances to White Bay on Jost Van Dyke through the reef. The BVI is under IALA-B rules which means red right returning. Of course, me being from New Zealand, we had a heated discussion about which system is right including who drives on the correct side of the road. My point is that we have the steering wheel on the right side of the car. But … we’re in the islands who the heck cares who is right? Right? Hmmm what we we stayed on island philosophy?Just maybe that’s the answer to the world’s problems. I’ll be sure and send that to Washington.

Inside the reef next to the beach the anchoring can get little tight and it is pretty shallow. Expect 4 feet under your keel and 50 feet to your neighbor.

Shallow in White Bay. Anchor with Caution.

Shallow in White Bay. Anchor with Caution.

Swim your anchor and make sure it is dug in properly.

Check the anchor

Check the anchor

Day 2 was a little short due to the time aberration of Willie T’s which made us get up late. So pretty much all we accomplished that day was a sail from Norman Island to White Bay JVD and a Vanilla Killer and lots of laughs.

We did have one technical issue however where the Autopilot even though it said it was off was still controlling the helm. That was freaky. We rebooted the Navigation and everything was fine.

Ducks: There is a blue duck with is a sailing faux pas, then there is a black duck with is a sailing faux pas which costs money and then there is a Red duck with is the spillage of alcohol. That night a series of events lead us to riffle through them all but making a tremendous come back from a black duck to end in just blue and red. It started with Tim slipping down the stairs and spilling his red wine all over the cushion – Red Duck! So we immediately washed it off and set it up to dry. The blue duck was not ensuring it was secure. The potential black duck was that it blew away during the night. The downgrade to a blue duck was that we recovered it on the beach in the morning – now full of sea water and sand. We unzipped it, washed it all out, dried it in the sun on the front trampoline (secured this time) and zipped it back up better than new. Red –> Blue –> Black –> Blue+Red. Embarrassing all the same. Tie down the cushions durh!

See Day 1 of Our Sailing Trip to the BVI

Day 3 and Day 4

 

NauticEd and its expert team are global brokers for the best sailing vacations. We’ve been just about everywhere and know the best spots. We can arrange the best boats and the best prices. In particular, if you want to go to the BVI, we are absolute experts.

If you’re unsure about your competence, well we are the absolute best in the world to bring you up to a proper and safe level of knowledge, skills, education, and globally accepted certifications.

Contact us about an awesome sailing vacation through this page.