Sailing Vector Game

Posted by Director of Education on December 13, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Rules of Right of Way, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Learn Sailboat Giveway Rules and Cure Boredom at the Same Time.

Here is a fun sailing game you can play ol’ school like when stuck on an airplane with a sailing buddy. It’s kinda like the old Race Car Vector Grid game but better ’cause it’s sailing. If you can drag your kids off the iPad, give it a go with them as well.

If you like this game LIKE it over there —>

Sailing Vector Game

 

Here is an example of a basic course layout.

Sailing Vector Game grid example course

And here is a blank sheet to create your own courses

Sailing Vector Game grid blank

Take a piece of Math Grid Paper. At the bottom left draw a horizontal start line approx. 6 squares across.

Draw the wind direction directly down the page. Lay out a course. For example, first buoy to windward, then second buoy across the page to the right, then 3rd buoy to leeward close to the bottom right of the page then back to first buoy then back through the start finish gate. Label the buoys Port or Starboard meaning the side of the boat all boats must leave the buoy to when rounding. Draw in some menacing islands.

Here is an example of a game played which takes about 20 minutes.

Sailing Vector Game play

A game played

Playing the Game

Read the rules through a few times. You’ll start to get it after a while. Pay particular attention to allowable maneuvers and giveway rules.

Maneuvering

  • Boats move by vectors in the grid denoted as Upwind and Downwind and or across wind on Starboard or across wind on Port.
  • Upwind is listed as U, downwind is listed as D. Across wind is listed as S(starboard) or P (port). E.g 1U:2S means the boat moves 1 square towards the wind and 2 squares to the left (boat on starboard)
  • Boats can only maneuver by increasing or decreasing the previous vector by maximum of 1 in only 1 of the Upwind/Downwind or Port/Starboard directions. However, if both vectors equal then the boat can accelerate or decelerate by 1 up AND by 1 cross.
  • At anytime the minimum move will be at least 1 square.
  • Loose two turns for repairs if you hit an island or go off the board.

Upwind and Tacking Maneuvers

  • Boats can not move more than 45 deg into the wind i.e. the Up vector number can not be more than the cross wind vector number.
  • A boat can tack through the wind at anytime. When the boat tacks the next starting vector is 1U:1(S or P)

Upwind and tacking examples:

1U:1S can accelerate to 2U:2S then to 3U:3S then to 4U:4S
2U:2S can decelerate to 1U:1S
2U:2S can turn to 1U:2S or 2U:3S
3U:3S can tack to 1U:1P
1U:1S tacks to 1U:1P
0U:3S tacks to 1U:1P
5D:3P tacks to 1U:1S
2U:1S is invalid because it is too close to the wind i.e upwind vector is greater than crosswind vector

Downwind and gybing maneuvers

  • A boat can go in any downwind direction, but the down vector can not be more than 3 greater than the cross vector because of reduced apparent wind. i.e. 3D:0S, 4D:1P, 5D:2P are valid whereas 4D:0S, 5D:1S are not valid
  • A boat can gybe between S and P but each time it will loose speed by 1 in each direction. i.e. 3D:3S gybe goes to 2D:2P on the opposite tack setting. If the crosswind vector is 1, then it remains at 1 on the other gybe setting. e.g. 3D:1S gybe results in 2D1P
  • When going directly downwind i.e. 0(S orP) a gybe reduces the downwind by 1 but the 0 across remains 0. Thus, a gybe from 3D:0S will go to 2D:0P
  • When on a beam reach e.g. 0D:3P a gybe causes the boat to decelerate 1 in the cross direction but angles downwind by 1. e.g. 0D:3P gybes to 1D:2S
  • 1D:1S gybes to 1D:1P and vice versa

Downwind and gybing examples:

4D:1S gybe goes to 3D:1P
5D:2S gybe goes to 4D:1P
3D:0S gybe goes to 2D:0P
4D:1S can slow to 3D:1S
4D:1S can not accelerate to 5D:1S
0D:3S gybe goes to 1D:2S
3U:3S gybe goes to 2D:2P
1U:1S gybe goes to 1D:1P

Starting

  • Players start anywhere they select but 1 square downwind from the start line
  • Players can not be on or pass the start line until after their 4th turn
  • A Players first move is either 1S or 1P
  • No violation of the giveway rules prior to start

Giveway Rules:

  • A boat on Port can not come close abeam or forward of another boat’s position on starboard at anytime during its maneuver. Close is defined by all positions 1(U or D)1:1(S or P) relative to the starboard boat’s position that are abeam or forward.
  • When on the same tack, a windward boat can not land on any possible position of the leeward’s boat next landing position.
  • A Port boat can not land on any possible position of a starboard’s boat next landing position.
  • No boat can make a maneuver to force another boat to leave the page.
  • No boat may land on another boat’s current position.

Have Fun!

Sailing Virgins in the BVI joins NauticEd

Posted by Director of Education on December 9, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

NauticEd Finds Sailing Virgins Sailing School

Only ten years ago America’s Cup contenders achieved around 13 knots boat speed. Now they are achieving close to 45 knots – in just ten years! Sailors in such a competition used to wear deck vests. Now they need body armor. Sailing is changing, fast.

Sailing Virgins is a sailing school born in this new environment: cool, fun, fast, and highly professional. With its core market of 20-40 year old adventurous professionals, the Sailing Virgins group quickly realized they would require a learning platform that suited the demanding lifestyles of people who don’t have a lot of free time and EXPECT 21st century cloud-based and App-based eLearning.

That’s why NauticEd and Sailing Virgins Work Well Together

As soon as a Sailing Virgins client signs up for a course, they are given online access to the NauticEd courses and can begin the theory component. No books; everything web and app based.

Then when students arrive at the Tortola, British Virgin Islands-based sailing school, they get straight on the boat and start sailing using their theory knowledge they have already gained (and passed the tests). Thus, exam day, which normally takes out most of a precious sailing day, is no longer a thing.  When in the BVI it’s all about sailing – gaining confidence and competence (and a fair bit of partying).

Courses are one week in duration, starting on a Sunday morning and finishing on a Saturday at lunchtime. There are three streams; Awesome Crew (for people who are figuring out the basics), Bareboat Charter Master (for people who want to charter their own boats) and Advanced Coastal (for people wishing to do longer sails and work in the industry). The calendar of courses is shown here (https://sailingvirgins.com/calendar-20162017/)

What does a typical day look like for a student in this Tortola, BVI Sailing School?

Waking up in a bay, a pre-breakfast swim off the back of the boat is a good idea. Then it’s coffee, breakfast, and a talk about the day. The instructor, using teaching methods refined in aviation training, has a mandate to balance professional teaching methods with keeping things fun.

What about the instructors?

All Sailing Virgins instructors have done time either skippering, route managing and/or instructing for sailing phenomenon The Yacht Week. They are fun, young, smart, professional, and hand selected. They have instructor certifications from the most revered sailing associations in the world. They can’t help but bring a little of the Yacht Week spirit into their courses. What they are definitely NOT are crusty ol’ sailors with a bearded boat. 

How do you get there?

What is the best way to reach the Virgin Islands? In Canada and the US there are direct flights from major east coast cities to St Thomas (STT). These include Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Miami, New York, Newark and Philadelphia. Other US cities (including Los Angeles and other west coast cities) can typically reach St Thomas with one connection.

From St Thomas it is an easy one hour ferry to West End, Tortola. Then you have arrived in the home of Sailing Virgins. Their base, at the Fish n Lime, is literally a walk from the ferry terminal. The Fish n Lime also has accommodation for anyone wishing to spend time before and after their course on land.

Next steps

If you would like to know more about the courses offered by Sailing Virgins, click here. For a free e-book from them titled “How To Become A Professional Skipper” click here.

Welcome on board Sailing Virgins to the NauticEd Platform – your clients are going to love the whole experience.

Set and Drift or Direction and Rate Problem

Posted by Director of Education on December 6, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Just for practice – solve the following problem on the Long Island Sound Chart. This is the chart that we use in the NauticEd Coastal Navigation Course.

 

At 2245 your GPS fixes your position at LAT 41 deg 01.75′ N and LONG 72 deg 48.40′ W. You are steering course 086 deg psc at a speed of 6.0 knots. At 2400 you fix your position at LAT 41 deg 04.2′ N and LONG 72 deg 38.85′ W. What were your set and drift?

Use the following
(1) Here is a pdf of the chart for you to work on
(2) On the chart, the variation is 14 deg W
(3) Since the problem says psc (per ships compass) we need to account of the ships compass deviation. In the NauticEd Coastal Navigation course exercises we used the following table.

 

Ships Compass Deviation Table

HDG MAG DEV HDG MAG DEV HDG MAG DEV
000° 2.0°E 120° 1.0°E 240° 3.0°W
030° 3.0°E 150° 1.0°W 270° 1.5°W
060° 4.0°E 180° 2.0°W 300° 0.0°
090° 2.0°E 210° 3.5°W 330° 1.5°E

Ans:

Set up the TVMDC table

T 074
V 14W
M 088
D  2E
C 086

Thus, your True heading on the chart is 074 deg T. Your water speed along this line is as given is 6 knots.

The time difference is 1 hour and 15 minutes = 1.25 hours. Thus in 1 hour and 15 minutes, you would travel 7.5 nautical miles.

Scribe a line 7.5 nm from the origin along 074 deg T line. This is your water position. The ground position is described by the GPS coords. Draw a line from your water position to the ground position. This is your 1.25 hour long current vector. It is headed due north and is 0.5 nm long. Since this happened in 1.25 hours the current speed is .5/1.25 = 0.4 nm/hr (knots).

Thus:

  • Set (or Direction) is 0 deg T
  • Drift (or Rate) is 0.4 knots

Note: Current is always expressed in deg True and always expressed in the direction it is heading whereas wind is expressed as where it comes from. Note and remember the difference – important.

No Cheating – do the problem first – here is the answer plot

Here is the real answer plot.

Sailing in the British Virgin Islands for 10 days – day 1

Posted by Director of Education on October 3, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

This is the start to a 10-day blog series sailing on a Lagoon 450 with the yacht charter company BVI Yacht Charters based in Road Town, British Virgin Islands.

The Indians, arh the Indians – my favorite. If you miss the Indians you have missed the BVI. It is an integral part of any trip here. It is a staple of the snorkeling diet – an appetizer of what is to come for the week. We just finished an hour with the head pointed down in colorful wonderment. Wow. (Click the Arrows for a slide show)

The Indians are generally the first stop on a BVI roundabout. They are 5 miles Southwest of Road Town. So your first sail is easy. Pop the main and the jib and an hour and a bit later you’re there.

While I’m writing this we’re parked up in The Bight in Norman Island.

The Bight Norman Island

The Bight Norman Island

 

The Bight, Norman Island

The Bight, Norman Island

The day started as an awakening blur of yesterday’s travel. Not bad – 12 hours door to door from Austin, Tx to Miami to Saint Thomas,  USVI. Then a haul ass to the ferry to catch the 3:30 ferry from Charlotte Amalie, USVI to Road Town, Tortolla. The last ferry was at 4:30 which coincided with catching BVI Customs closing at 6:00. Whew –  basically seamless travel just a lot depends on things being on time which are out of your control like airlines.

At the end of it all, you sit back with a drink and say – Hey we’re on Island time, what does it matter? Stress has been banned from the Virgin Islands so you have leave your corporate training at home.

BVI Yacht Charters are located close to downtown Road Town – a really short taxi ride from the ferry terminal. Very convenient. And even more convenient, close to two Grocery stores RiteWay and OneMart. Most of the stuff you can order online through their websites and have delivered directly to your boat before you arrive. For the remaining items,  you can take a short stroll to the store with a cold beer in hand.

Road Town BVI

Road Town BVI

Tony from BVIYC gave us our boat check out briefing this morning and after signing my life away, as usual, we were ready to head out. We were exempted from the chart briefing because … well… I did write the book on it. I had to laugh with Kirstie in the office when she said “I know you wrote the book on it but have you been here before”. She was right to ask – any area you go sailing, you need a familiarity with the area for two reasons: (1) to make sure you have a good time and take advantage of all there is to offer, and more importantly,  (2) to make sure you know where all the dangerous stuff is. The NauticEd BVI Chart Briefing book and associated test is a comprehensive guide to sailing in the BVI. Those that have taken the test and passed it are able to skip the chart briefing and speed up the check-in process. In addition, it means you have all that information on hand.

I must say that the BVI check out crew were so efficient and awesome. The boat was immaculate and ready to go. They even lent us an audio jack cord for plugging in from the stereo to our iPhones (haa haa – everyone on our boat figured that each other would bring that cable – not one between all of us – don’t ever forget to bring a 3.5 mm audio jack to play your tunes.)

So, after a crew safety briefing, we released the dock lines and headed out. Yay. A short sail to Norman Island and my fav. the Indians.

For now, we are listening to a little Lyle Lovette in Pirates Bight, Norman Island. I hear some laughter on the front deck – I’m heading that way.

On shore in the Pirates Bight are two restaurants. Both are very (very) nice. Take a recently emptied credit card. But the experience and the beach is worth a visit at least.

On shore at Pirates Bight

On shore at Pirates Bight

At Willie T’s there is a universal singularity point. The laws of the universe are just different. What you think should apply, doesn’t. After drinks on the front deck of our boat, we moved to Willie T’s to observe this anomaly. But that is my point – soon observation turns into participation. If you can resist, the two things to try to avoid are: (1) the ski shots.  This consists of a water ski with 4 shot glass holes drilled into the ski. When it comes off the ceiling 4 souls are drawn seemingly by magic to put their lips to a shots glass and the ski tips back on its own volition with the smooth liquid pouring down warm throats; (2) Rafter swinging –  these do not end well. Assuming you’ve been working out at the gym, the challenge is to swing hand over hand along the steel rafters. The problem is that the rafters are rusty and all four crew members who tried and completed it (including one of our better-looking crew members) ended leaving the boat with less skin than they started with including yours truly. But at least the gym work paid off with a success grade in the swing. Skin was traded for self-esteem.

Willie T's Universal Singularity

Willie T’s. A Universal Singularity

And, in case you don’t know about Willie T’s – William T. Thornton was the architect who designed the U.S. White House. His boat was purchased and permanently anchored in Pirates Bight. It is now a floating bar with a dinghy dock. They serve some food but the main focus is the bar. It is not really a family place if you get my points from above.

Nighty Night. See you on Day 2!

NauticEd and its expert team are global brokers for the best sailing vacations. We’ve been just about everywhere and know the best spots. We can arrange the best boats and the best prices. In particular, if you want to go to the BVI, we are absolute experts.

If you’re unsure about your competence, well we are the absolute best in the world to bring you up to a proper and safe level of knowledge, skills, education, and globally accepted certifications.

Contact us about an awesome sailing vacation through this page.

Sailing in the British Virgin Islands for 10 days – day 2

Posted by Director of Education on under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

This is Day 2 of our sailing trip in the British Virgin Islands with BVI Yacht Charters on a Lagoon 450.

Needing a little hair of the dog from Willie T’s, the crew elected to sail to Jost Van Dyke island for our next stop over in White Bay where the famous Soggy Dollar bar serves the most delicious Pain Killers and other concoctions. My favorite however, is the Vanilla Killer and our bartender Sana serves them with a great smile. She has worked at the Soggy Dollar for 11 years.

Sana at the Soggy Dollar will take care of you

Sana at the Soggy Dollar will take care of you

The beach at White Bay is one of the more awesome beaches in the BVI. It is not to be missed. There are also several other restaurants and bars along the beach. Just be aware to leave the beach prior to dusk. No See’ems come out and will eat your legs off. Otherwise, during the day there are no bities.


There are two entrances to White Bay on Jost Van Dyke through the reef. The BVI is under IALA-B rules which means red right returning. Of course, me being from New Zealand, we had a heated discussion about which system is right including who drives on the correct side of the road. My point is that we have the steering wheel on the right side of the car. But … we’re in the islands who the heck cares who is right? Right? Hmmm what we we stayed on island philosophy?Just maybe that’s the answer to the world’s problems. I’ll be sure and send that to Washington.

Inside the reef next to the beach the anchoring can get little tight and it is pretty shallow. Expect 4 feet under your keel and 50 feet to your neighbor.

Shallow in White Bay. Anchor with Caution.

Shallow in White Bay. Anchor with Caution.

Swim your anchor and make sure it is dug in properly.

Check the anchor

Check the anchor

Day 2 was a little short due to the time aberration of Willie T’s which made us get up late. So pretty much all we accomplished that day was a sail from Norman Island to White Bay JVD and a Vanilla Killer and lots of laughs.

We did have one technical issue however where the Autopilot even though it said it was off was still controlling the helm. That was freaky. We rebooted the Navigation and everything was fine.

Ducks: There is a blue duck with is a sailing faux pas, then there is a black duck with is a sailing faux pas which costs money and then there is a Red duck with is the spillage of alcohol. That night a series of events lead us to riffle through them all but making a tremendous come back from a black duck to end in just blue and red. It started with Tim slipping down the stairs and spilling his red wine all over the cushion – Red Duck! So we immediately washed it off and set it up to dry. The blue duck was not ensuring it was secure. The potential black duck was that it blew away during the night. The downgrade to a blue duck was that we recovered it on the beach in the morning – now full of sea water and sand. We unzipped it, washed it all out, dried it in the sun on the front trampoline (secured this time) and zipped it back up better than new. Red –> Blue –> Black –> Blue+Red. Embarrassing all the same. Tie down the cushions durh!

See Day 1 of Our Sailing Trip to the BVI

Day 3 and Day 4

 

NauticEd and its expert team are global brokers for the best sailing vacations. We’ve been just about everywhere and know the best spots. We can arrange the best boats and the best prices. In particular, if you want to go to the BVI, we are absolute experts.

If you’re unsure about your competence, well we are the absolute best in the world to bring you up to a proper and safe level of knowledge, skills, education, and globally accepted certifications.

Contact us about an awesome sailing vacation through this page.

Sailing in the British Virgin Islands for 10 days – day 3 and 4

Posted by Director of Education on under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper, Videos and photos | Comments are off for this article

This is day 3 and 4 of sailing in The BVI with BVI Yacht Charters on a Lagoon 450.

DROP AND GIVE ME 20 yelled Jeff as we did mountain climbers, burpies, press ups and beach sprints for a morning workout. What a way to start a day and White Bay beach is the best for it. Imagine working out and jogging on this beach in the morning to work up a good sweat then just fall in the water at the end – now stop imagining and go there!

White Bay Beach

White Bay Beach, JVD, BVI

Sandy Cay was on our way to our next stop Cane Garden Bay. I’d never been to Sandy Cay before – always electing the much smaller Sandy Spit which is also very cool and not to be missed but Sandy Cay is pretty special too, now that I know. It has a most amazing white sandy beach with awesome swimming. We did a reenactment of Hallie Berry in the James Bond movie where he offered her a mojito as she came out of the water. But alas not as good as the original. Still, the model was great – biased option of course.

Mojito

Mojito? On Sandy Cay!

Don’t miss the incredible sandy beach at Sandy Cay – usually you can have this beach to yourself. (not after this blog goes viral though).

Still with plenty of time in the day we decided to reverse direction a little and go see Bubbling Pools at the north east end of JVD (Jost Van Dyke); between JVD and Little JVD. Here the wash of the water rushes through some rocks and ends up in a little pool. Since the water has been roughed up through the rocks, it is like a little jacuzzi -fun.

Bubbling Pools

Bubbling Pools

To get there, you anchor or grab a mooring ball next to Foxy’s Taboo (Not Foxy’s) and walk north along the trail for about ½ a mile. Turn left as you climb a little knoll. With a Northerly swell, Bubbling Pools can be a lot of fun and depending on the size of the swell can border on dangerous. Anyway, it is great to see and well worth the walk.  On the way, I walked past the Caribbean Manchineel poison apple tree and shot this video.

 

After Bubbling Pools we stopped at Foxy’s Taboo Restaurant. Of all the trips I’ve done to the BVI, this was the first time I had visited Foxy’s Taboo. Big mistake should have done it before because speaking of danger, they’ve got a few dangerous drinks which is dependant more on the swill than the swell.

Foxy's Taboo Jost Van Dyke

Foxy’s Taboo Jost Van Dyke

“Friggin in the Riggin” drink was the most popular amongst the crew.

Back to the boat we set sails for Cane Garden Bay. The entrance into Cane Garden Bay is well marked with a green and red. Keep red to right.

Cane Garden Bay Entrance

Cane Garden Bay Entrance

This is one of my more favorite spots in the BVI – why? Don’t know – just is. There is a long beach that is populated with bars and restaurants. It’s a little touristy as it caters to the Cruise ship crowd taxi’d over from Road Town. Still, the bay is quaint and the locals are friendly. There are heaps of mooring balls and if they run out you can save $30 and anchor just beyond the most outer mooring which is still pretty close to the beach anyway. There is a decent grocery store, Bobby’s – well decent enough to pick up a few extras. They could up their game a little on the vegies.

Cane Garden Bay

Cane Garden Bay

To the north end of the bay is a large pier where you can get fuel, water and ice. The bay is open to the north and west so stay away if there is a big swell as you’ll get slammed against the pier wall. We stayed in CGB for 2 nights just because of its idyllic setting. They have lots of water sports on the beach and a giant swimming area.

A quick digress: A note about the bays and beaches anywhere you go in the world. While it may seem obvious to us all, but the Charter Companies would rather you dump out the head rather than send it into the tanks. They do this to not clog the tanks or get calls from clients saying they flushed something they should not have could you please come unblock it. BUT please, no matter what they say, close the seacocks when in a harbor. Then just remember to dump after you get out away from the shore 3 miles.  

Back in Cane Garden Bay, the next morning we had a massive pig out breakfast with Bloody Mary’s to start the day. Then we went on a hunt for a set of flip flops for Jeff who blew out his flip flop (and stepped on a pop top) on the hike to Bubbling Pools yesterday.   Seemingly the day flew by but not without some serious fun in the water, fun with the dinghy and fun with the sea kayak. There was a weak call for to check out the night life on shore but moment later the call was followed by snoring. Yet again – failing from the experience of yesterday, we went from Blue to black and back to blue Ducks again. I mean come on people. We neglected to secure the Sea Kayak. Some rotten

Yet again – failing to learn from the experience of yesterday, we went from Blue to black and back to blue Ducks again. I mean come on people. We neglected to secure the Sea Kayak. Some rotten soles in the middle of the night went joy riding on our kayak that was tied up behind. They left the kayak at someone else’s boat. We only found out about the joy ride part rather than theft by a keen eyed crew member spotting a dinghy driving around the harbor towing a red sea kayak and stopping at each boat. This happened just as we had resigned ourselves to paying the rental company for the Sea Kayak. So potential black again turned to only blue. Notes to self and Crew. Let’s secure the boat properly prior to going to bed.

See Day 5 

See day 2 of sailing in the BVI with BVI Yacht Charters on a Lagoon 450

Sailing in the British Virgin Islands for 10 days – day 5

Posted by Director of Education on under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

At the north west end of Cane Garden bay is the water and fuel dock.  To start the day. we topped off with water and fuel and headed out for a sail up the north side of Tortola. The

At the dock I filmed a couple of videos that we will be including in our upcoming Bareboat Crew Course.

Getting the line secured to the dock quickly and how to easily move the boat close to the dock

The 15 knot forecast turned to 30 knots and at the top end hitting 44 knots. We double reefed the main and head sail. Despite the reefing we were still hitting 7.5 knots max speed.  Sea state was about 6 feet, nothing too big but big enough to toss anything around not secured below. Still, the wind was plenty enough. What a great sail that was – yipee!

We doused the sails after the wind spiked to 44 knots. I mean, it’s nothing too much to handle but forces on the rig and lines are too much for a vacation especially when you have a choice. People get hurt when forces are this big. Stay safe.

We decided to stop at Monkey point for a snorkel. Years ago I had stopped here and been so impressed by the coral and fish. Today, not so much. The coral seemed mostly gone and about the only thing interesting to see was a lion fish. Pretty but a bloody nuisance to the reef. They have no predators and are a very invasive species. The BVI would rather be rid of them and are promoting that at least humans become their predator despite their poisonous spines. But apparently, they say the fish itself is nice to eat. I took this photo with my GoPro.

lionfish

 

With the wind coming out of the east at 35 knots we pressed on through Little Caminoe Cut and over to Scrub Island under power. Scrub Island Resort is supposed to be very fancy and so I thought we’d stop there for a fancy drink. One with fruit and an umbrella. Unfortunately, I think the pink flamingo floaty tied on the trampoline scared the Scrub Island folks into thinking perhaps we were not such the right client. Well actually pretty sure it was that their marina was full because they did say welcome and to anchor over there; pointing 2 miles away. Anyway, perhaps if they read this they might invite me back for a review. Suffice to say – here is their resort. It does look nice but probably you should book ahead if you want to stop there – even for a fruity drink.

Scrub Island Resort

Scrub Island Resort

Scrub Island Marina

Scrub Island Marina

Pushing on we elected to end our day at Savannah Bay; another of my favorites. There are three gorgeous beaches in Savannah Bay. No supplies are available so you need to be self-sufficient if you go here. The beaches are the best and it was a great opportunity to show case our boat the Lagoon 45 Catamaran.

 

You’ve got to be really careful with Savannah bay however. There is a big reef out front and the only entrance is on the west end. There are no mooring balls so you must anchor. Inside the reef there are a few other hazardous rocks and reefs but marked well and accurately on the GPS charts. Some charter companies are not too keen on you going in here.

Savannah Bay Entrance and Exit

Savannah Bay Entrance and Exit

You CAN NOT anchor at Savannah Bay if the wind and swell is out of the west. The reef does not protect you from the swell and you will have a very rocky night.

 

Entering Savannah bay we wondered slightly about all the power boats tied stern to the beach on the middle beach. Usually, Savannah Bay is pretty deserted. We were soon to find out why. See day 8. OMG.

 

On shore we played beach bats and then with out warning, along the beach comes Jonathan and Evette and family, our good friends from Austin. How random is that? Behind the beaches in Savannah bay are gorgeous condos for rent. They had just finished a week charter and were decompressing/relaxing in a condo for 3 days. It’s a good idea to do this.

At the very north end of the whole bay is a gorgeous area for snorkeling. One of the best in the BVI I think.

This was the biggest day sail today having come from Cane Garden Bay all the way across the north of Tortola, around the east end past the airport, past the Dogs and over to the most gorgeous spot of Savannah Bay.

See Day 6

See Day 3 and 4 of Sailing in the BVI with BVI Yacht Charters on a Lagoon 45 Catamaran

HEY – did you know that NauticEd is an agent for all the big Yacht Charter Companies worldwide. We don’t charge you a fee and we know all the good companies and the places to go. Come see us here – http://www.nauticed.org/sailing-vacations

Sailing in the British Virgin Islands for 10 days – day 6

Posted by Director of Education on under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

This is Day 6 of sailing in the BVI with BVI Yacht Charters for 10 days on a Lagoon 45 Catamaran

In the morning we snorkeled the coral garden in the north east end of Savannah Bay for a second time. See day 5 for a quick underwater video of the coral. This area is by far the best snorkeling area we found in the BVI. It is about 10 feet deep with towering coral columns. Awesome.

under water

While the crew fluffed their aura readying for the day, I took the opportunity to shoot some video of how to operate a dinghy. I’ve found over all our dozens of trips all over this awesome planet that it is important to have your crew members know how to properly operate a dinghy. It’s just a really good idea and you will avert disaster. For example, you might know but you crew won’t understand just what happens if you let your dinghy get sideways to the waves at the beach.

Here is the great training video we created that we will put into our coming Bareboat Charter Crew Course.

Next stop a snorkel at Seal Dog. There is only one mooring ball there which is reserved for commercial dive boats. This is a designated dive by dive operators in the BVI. The water was clear and the snorkel was refreshing. Nothing too much to write home about in regards to snorkeling however. Still, it was a picturesque stop with clear clear water.

Seal Dog

North Sound Virgin Gorda here we come!

On the sail there we called ahead to Levereck Bay Resort and made reservations for the Pig Roast that evening. They set aside a nice table in the sand for 8. Awesome. Meanwhile, while in North Sound we decided to do a pub crawl of the bars to check them all out. Why not?

North Sound Virgin Gorda

North Sound Virgin Gorda

Saba Rock is a really nice restaurant and bar. I mean really nice. It is well worth a drink stop if not for lunch or dinner. They have a nice boutique gift shop for a few good souvenirs as well. BVI Coffee cup for me so that I remember this trip every morning when I get back. It helps keep life in perspective. Sometimes we all get mixed up on what life really is about. Speaking of perspective, from Saba rock you have a nice view of Sir Richard Branson’s world famous resort, Necker Island. Once Sir Rich invites me over I’ll write a nice blog about his resort. Looking forward to that. I’ve read his inspiring autobiography, “Loosing My Virginity” about building his life and I once saw him on the dock in Monaco walking onto his boat the Virginian and my brother is a pilot for Virgin so I think all that qualifies me for an invite right? Hint Hint Sir Richard!

Saba Rock, Virgin Gorda, BVI

Saba Rock, Virgin Gorda, BVI

Saba Rock, Virgin Gorda, BVI

Saba Rock, Virgin Gorda, BVI

From Saba Rock we dinghied over to the famous Bitter End for afternoon cocktails. They have a new Tiki bar outside on the beach which makes a good hang out. The entire Bitter End Yacht Club is a must must stop for a trip to the BVI and in fact it is tempting to stop there for 2 nights. They have water sports, really nice rooms for a potential night off the boat, multiple restaurants, a pub bar, a resupply store, water hose for the boat, probably a hundred mooring balls and generally all around nice atmosphere and good staff.

Bitter EndYacht Club, Virgin Gorda, BVI

Bitter End Yacht Club, Virgin Gorda, BVI

Bitter EndYacht Club, Virgin Gorda, BVI

Bitter EndYacht Club, Virgin Gorda, BVI

 

Still, we needed to fulfill our pub crawl edict and so we pushed on over to the Fat Virgin Bar just around the corner in Biras Creek Bay.

backToTheBoat

At Fat Virgin, we enjoyed the most delicious Conch fritters and a few libations. Fat Virgin is a great little stop over and worth at least a drink and fritter. Now out of time, we pushed off and sailed back to Levereck Bay missing the last bar called Freddies Sand Box. Sorry Freddy – next time. Your place did look like a nice relaxing joint from the water however.

Freddies Sand Box Bar

Freddies Sand Box Bar

Levereck Bay in the west end of North sound is also a must stop. They provide everything you need: water at the dock, ice, reprovisioning store, giant restaurant, and resort.

Levereck Bay, North Sound, Virgin Gorda,BVI

Levereck Bay, North Sound, Virgin Gorda, BVI

At 7, we dinghied ashore where our table was ready right next to Jumbies Bar in a gorgeous setting. The pig roast is a giant amazingly great quality buffet with more food than you can think of. The cost is $35 which albeit quite expensive – you might as well do it. You’re on vacation after all. What is really worth it is the band the followed. It was a reggae/pop/cover band if you can think what that is. Anyway they were so good that can turn any song into fun. Then the real fun started; the Jumbies. They are a group dressed in brightly colored clothing on about 7 foot stilts. Oh wow – they got the party started. On the stilts they dance and do tricks and whoop up the crowd into a frenzy. They really made the night! Thanks Jumbies!!!!

See Day 5

Day 7 coming soon

 

HEY – did you know that NauticEd is an agent for all the big Yacht Charter Companies worldwide. We don’t charge you a fee and we know all the good companies and the places to go. Come see us here – http://www.nauticed.org/sailing-vacations

Practical Training Course Matrix

Posted by Director of Education on September 19, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Rules of Right of Way, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

With responsible sailing knowledge there is, of course, theory and practical skills to learn and demonstrate.

When you get with your practical instructor, it is highly recommended to complete the appropriate theory courses prior to the practical training. Otherwise, you’ll spend too much time on the basics preventing the instructor from doing their real work which is to get your hands on the helm and the lines. You don’t want the instructor spending valuable on-the-water time explaining who gives way or how the sails create forces. If this is the case, the instructor may not be able to spend the proper amount of time on the practical skills and thus be forced to fail your desired practical competence ability.

Here is the matrix of courses you should complete vs the Practical Competence Ability you are seeking from your instructor. We hope you take this list seriously. It has been designed by professionals to ensure your competence and confidence on the water. Please do your best to complete them PRIOR to your practical training.

MATCH YOUR PRACTICAL COMPETENCE ABILITY WITH THE THEORY COURSES AND RANKS BELOW

  • Captain – All of:
    • Skipper
    • Maneuvering Under Power
    • Coastal Navigation
    • Electronic Navigation
    • Bareboat Charter
    • Anchoring
    • Storm Tactics
    • Weather
    • SailTrim
    • Safety at Sea

Also for Captain requirement, you are required to have been on an extended distance sailing trip of at least 200 miles with one through-the-night sailing whereby you participated in all aspects of navigation, helm, sail trim, life aboard tasks, and watch.

How to Operate a Dinghy Safely

Posted by Director of Education on August 10, 2016 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper, Videos and photos | Comments are off for this article

Last week, NauticEd and crew went to the British Virgin Islands and chartered a Lagoon 450 from BVI Yacht Charters. We went down there to specifically get more content for our courses including video and pictures.

Here is a great video we shot for teaching crew members how to operate a dinghy.

As Skipper, you might be fully versed on dinghy operations but we can guarantee that your crew are not and the last thing you need on your sailing vacation is a dinghy accident.

You’re welcome to send this blog on to your crew.

Thanks go to BVI Yacht Charters for providing such an excellent experience. I highly recommend them as a charter company. If you’re wanting to go to the BVI for a sailing vacation, we can arrange at no cost to you the boat charter and give excellent advice on where to go and what are the cool hideaway spots.

Contact us for sailing vacations via this page

Take the Bareboat Charter Course AND have your crew also take this course. You’re spending $5k on your trip. Make sure you make the most out of it.

Bareboat Charter Sailing Course

Also, see our BVI Fast Check Out Chart Briefing Course

Wanting to be completely qualified to Yacht Charter? Take our Bareboat Charter Master Bundle of Courses and log your previous sailing in our free NauticEd electronic Logbook. Yacht Charter Companies worldwide accept the NauticEd Bareboat Charter Master Rank. Sign in and start now.