NauticEd is now the official provider for the U.S. Naval Sea Cadets

Posted by Director of Education on July 1, 2015 under About NauticEd, Maneuvering Under Power, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Please give us kudos for this achievement by liking this on facebook.

Such an awesome endorsement – The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet, Courageous Division Sailing Program has taken NauticEd on as the sole provider for sailing training.

U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Program official provider

NauticEd becomes U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Program official provider

We think this is pretty cool and a great endorsement for our hard work over the past 8 years.

Cadets will initially start out with the NauticEd Skipper Rank bundle of courses. This includes our Skipper Course and our Maneuvering Under Power course. Both courses are essential to starting out operating and skippering a sailboat. The Skipper course is about 20 hours of study and the Maneuvering Under Power Course is about 4 hours of online study and about 3 hours of actual maneuvering practice on the water. Embedded into the MUP course is 28 on the water practical exercises. Once completed, students become completely confident with tight quarters maneuvering in high wind conditions.

Students don’t reach the Rank of skipper online, of course. They must to at least 10 days of sea experience. Half of which at least as master of the vessel. Or if they receive 4 days of practical on-the-water instruction and receive a proficiency verification by one of our affiliate instructors.

The NauticEd Sailing Resume tracks the practical time and automatically awards the Rank when due. Students can then download their sailing certificate and resume.

We are proud to be a U.S. Naval Supporter.

Take the NauticEd Skipper bundle of courses today! (Hover over each course below then over the information icon)

 

Practical Proficiency vs ICC Assessment

Posted by Director of Education on June 28, 2015 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Here is a question from one of our students and our answer:

Grant,

I am trying to find a school that will administer your verified proficiency test or checkout.  I thought I read that it could be done in one day by one of your affiliated schools.  I am making a trip to Annnapolis, MD in July and have added an extra day to get this done.  However the local school that I contacted is also telling me about a four day course.  I don’t know if I am asking them for the correct thing.  The school that I contacted is Yachting Education.  He mentioned the RYA Day Skipper Course which I have signed up for on your site and am slowly working through the modules.  However I am just looking for the Verified Proficiency Certificate at this point and my time in Annapolis is limited.

Tom

Here is our Answer

>>>>>>>>>>>>

Tom

Good question – Let me elaborate and explain the differences.

(1) There is verified proficiency –  this is a verification to yacht charter companies that you have been out with an instructor and they verify that you can sail competently. It however has nothing to do with gaining the ICC license as required by European Countries. This takes as long as it takes. i.e. if you demonstrate to the instructor immediately over a 3-4 hour period that you are totally competent then that is what it takes and virtually any affiliated  instructor will sign off. If you’re a bit light on a few things then the instructor may see the need for some instruction to get you to the point of being competent and proficient. That may take several days or just a few hours depending on your existing experience and competence. Basically, the instructor will not sign it until you are Competent and Proficient. And again basically it is an indication to charter companies that you are verified by an independent professional party. Yacht charter companies accept this. There is a caveat regarding European Countries however – the country not necessarily the charter company will require the ICC license. If you have an accident and there is an investigation and you don’t hold the correct license you could be in a lot of trouble in a foreign country and court.

(2) And there is the ICC Practical Competence Assessment. To gain the ICC license required by European countries you must do a Practical Competence Assessment in addition to doing the RYA Day Skipper Theory course. The Practical Competence Assessment must be administered by an Instructor that has been authorized by a national sailing body appointed by their government. The government has to be a country that signed United Nations Resolution 40. The USA and Canada did not sign this resolution. Thus no USA national sailing body can issue an ICC. United Kingdom did sign the resolution and they appointed the RYA (Royal Yachting Association) as their national sailing body. Thus for the ICC for North Americans, the license can be issued through the UK National Sailing body – the RYA. Once you pass the RYA Day Skipper Theory Course from NauticEd you need to go to an approved RYA practical school to be practically accessed. Yachting Education in Annapolis is one of the only few schools in North America that is an approved RYA school and the only RYA North American school focused on recreational sailing ICC license.

Strange as it may seem – but since the ICC requirement has gained its strength in Europe mostly in 2014, North Americans are now struggling to figure out the ICC requirement. It’s why NauticEd flew to the UK last year to make our alliance and provide this service for North Americans and also for any other country citizens not a signatory to United Nations res. 40 ICC creation.

The ICC practical portion sign off then can be gained in 2 ways. (1) a one day assessment. You must demonstrate total competence in sailing and navigation (thus the RYA Day skipper theory requirement because of the extensive navigation knowledge required). or (2) a 5 day on the water training to gain the RYA Day Skipper Practical Certificate.

Yachting Education in Annapolis administers both the one day ICC assessment and the 5 day practical training. If you do the 5 day training, your are virtually guaranteed to gain the ICC because of the extensive training that Mark will give you. If you do the 1 day assessment and you are up to speed on sailing and navigation tides etc then you should have no problem.

Yacht Charter companies world wide accept the ICC license easily because they understand the extensive test out you have been through. ICC is not a one day weekend warrior bucket list sailing course provided by most North American Sailing Associations. It is a true international sailing license. Charter companies however also require a sailing resume listing practical experience. This is why we provide a free online logbook to our students and a free resume building tool.

I hope that answers your question. Since you are already an RYA Day Skipper Student, you should be looking for Yachting Education to do either the ICC one day assessment or the 5 day RYA Day Skipper Practical Training.

If you were based in any other country in the world who has not signed resolution 40, then you can go to an RYA school in that country to do your practical accessment or training (after you have taken the RYA Day Skipper Theory Course from NauticEd).

Last month our team went to the Bahamas to train with Mark @ Yachting Education for the 5 day  training. Whilst we are all very competent, we figured what the heck we might learn something. Wow heck yes we learned a lot of tips and tricks from Mark and the experience was well worth it. Now that it is summer he has moved his operation back to Annapolis. So even if you are competent, don’t discount the value of a 5 days training. And who can complain about the opportunity to sail around the Chesapeake bay for 5 days stopping at historic ports and villages?

Please also watch the video on the RYA Day Skipper Page it explains a lot more.

Sincerely

Grant Headifen

Director of Education NauticEd

How to Sail Your Boat to the Dock

Posted by Director of Education on May 28, 2015 under Bareboat Charter, Maneuvering Under Power, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

We created these animations to show the process of sailing your boat to the dock when approaching from an up-wind or down-wind position.

If you like posts like this then please LIKE it on facebook and also LIKE our facebook page over there ——>
You’ll get notifications when we post cool stuff like this.

These are the kinds of really helpful tips and tricks that we post in our Skipper Course. Take the NauticEd Skipper Course NOW and add it to your FREE NauticEd online sailing resume. A sailing resume is required by Yacht Charter Companies EVERY TIME you charter.

Heading Up-Wind at the Dock

Heading Down-Wind at the Dock. Notice the difference in start positions.

Take the NauticEd Skipper Course Now

skipper course

Skipper Sailing Course

Sheet In or Sheet Out?

Posted by Director of Education on May 25, 2015 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article


If you like what we have done here, please LIKE it on facebook – thanks it really helps us grow. While you are at it please follow/LIKE our facebook page over there ——> we post fun cool stuff.

Here are some great examples of how you can read the tell-tales and instantly know what to do. Look at each example and decide what you should be doing.

In the examples, click the selection box you think best on the image.

In this example above you are on the starboard side of the boat since the boat is going from left to right. Also, you see the green tell-tale over the top of the red. Red is on port side of the boat. The green tell-tale is on this side of the window and on the starboard side of the boat. And one more observation is required and that is that the genoa is on the other side of the mast and thus on the port side of the boat.

Given all the deductions from above, the wind must be coming from your right hand and flowing into the computer screen to the left. The green tell-tale is being starved of air whilst you can see the red has plenty as it is flowing smoothly. This means there is turbulent air on the starboard side of the boat.

If you sheet in (tighten up the sails by pulling on the post side working jib sheet) slightly this will allow the incident wind to flow more smoothly on the this side of the sail. The green tell-tale will then start flying backwards smoothly. We show this concept of smooth vs turbulent airflow using moving arrows inside our FREE Basic Sail Trim Course.

i.e. in the above – Sheet in!

If you are struggling with this  - simply take our FREE Basic Sail Trim course. It will make you more knowledgeable than most sailors out there.

FREE Basic Sail Trim Course

FREE Basic Sail Trim Course

or get it on iPad ($a buck .99)

 

Here are some more examples to test your knowledge.

So what do you think? Are you ready to take our FREE Basic Sail Trim Course now?

Go there now – what the heck – throw caution, timidity and fear to the wind!

 

FREE GUIDE:  Learn how to gain a sailing certification with NauticEd

Head Up or Bear Away?

Posted by Director of Education on May 24, 2015 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article


If you like what we have done here, please LIKE it on facebook – thanks it really helps us grow. While you are at it please follow/LIKE our facebook page over there ——> we post fun cool stuff.

Here are some great examples of how you can read the tell-tales and instantly know what to do. Look at each example and decide what you should be doing.

In the examples, click the selection box you think best on the image.

In this example above you are on the port side of the boat since the boat is going from right to left. Also, you see the red tell-tale over the top of the green. Red is on port side of the boat. The green tell-tale is on the other side of the window and the starboard side of the boat. And one more observation is required and that is that the genoa is on the other side of the mast and thus on the starboard side of the boat.

Given all the deductions from above, the wind must be coming from your left hand and flowing into the computer screen to the right. The green tell-tale is being starved of air whilst you can see the red has plenty as it is flowing smoothly. This means there is turbulent air on the starboard side of the boat.

If you turn the boat into the wind slightly this will allow the incident wind to flow more smoothly on the other side of the sail. The green tell-tale will then start flying backwards smoothly. We show this concept of smooth vs turbulent airflow using moving arrows inside our FREE Basic Sail Trim Course.

i.e. in the above – HEAD UP!

If you are struggling with this  - simply take our FREE Basic Sail Trim course. It will make you more knowledgeable than most sailors out there.

FREE Basic Sail Trim Course

FREE Basic Sail Trim Course

or get it on iPad ($a buck .99)

 

Here are some more examples to test your knowledge.

So what do you think? Are you ready to take our FREE Basic Sail Trim Course now?

Go there now – what the heck – throw caution, timidity and fear to the wind!

 

FREE GUIDE:  Learn how to gain a sailing certification with NauticEd
 

Drone Tour of Road Town Harbour BVI

Posted by Director of Education on May 19, 2015 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Here is something pretty cool that we found. It’s Rick Moore’s drone tour of the Road Town Harbour in the BVI

We know a lot of you go to the BVI to charter because of the enormous sales of our BVI Fast Check Out Chart Briefing Course.

If you are thinking about going to the BVI, contact us we offer no cost consulting and reservations on which company to use and when are the best times to go.

Check out out BVI Fast Check Out Chart Briefing Course which is accepted by most yacht charter companies as an alternative to the sit down time consuming chart briefing prior to leaving the dock. The advantage of this briefing is also that you have all the information with you during your trip. Available online and in PDF and iPad formats.

BVIChartBriefing

The BVI Fast Check Out Chart Briefing is accepted by most yacht charter companies.

BVI Chart Briefing

The BVI Chart Briefing is available also in iPad format

Snap Test: Who gives way?

Posted by Director of Education on May 18, 2015 under Bareboat Charter, Coastal Navigation, Rules of Right of Way, Skipper | Comments are off for this article



Here’s a fun little test. If you like it, please LIKE this on facebook – thanks it really helps us grow and keeps people safe on the water.

Also look over there ——-> and LIKE our facebook page. We post really fun and cool stuff on facebook.

Know the Official Rules for Prevention of Collision at Sea

Tap on the answer you think is best in the image below.

So here’s the deal – if you got it wrong or hesitated,  you should complete our FREE NauticEd Navigation Rules Course.

Some people have posted really great comments about this image on the facebook post from Not under Command to is B anchored or moored and these are all relevant questions. Well done if you are thinking at this level. There is a dead giveaway in the image here as to what B is doing. Let’s just assume however that the boats are under command – I just didn’t have a good 3d image of people to place in the pic.

HOW TO GET THIS FREE COURSE NOW !

Sign up here now for FREE and this course will automatically be in your Curriculum!

BONUSSign up now and we will also give you a FREE Basic SailTrim Course.

Already A NauticEd Student?

If you are already a NauticEd student, then this course is waiting for you in your Curriculum when you log back in.

Sign in – to access you free course.

 

International Rules for Prevention of Collision at Sea FREE Course

International Rules for Prevention of Collision at Sea FREE Sailng Course

You’re out there all the time. You look under the sail and you see this scenario above. You’ve got to know what to do instantly. If you make the wrong decision, you could cause a collision with serious damage, injury or death. And it would be your fault because you didn’t take the time to learn and know the rules.  I feel like I can give you a hard time here, because the course is absolutely FREE. We made it FREE because the rules are that important. I’ve seen and I bet you’ve seen too many bozos out there.

Take the FREE NauticEd Navigation Rules Course now for FREE. Did we say FREE?

If you have an iOS device then download our FREE NauticEd App and take this course here for FREE off-line when you are waiting in the doctor’s office or stuck on an airplane.

 

Why not take the test every 6 months or so just to stay current?

We even have a paper book that you can order from Amazon to keep on your boat.

Buy it here:

Or Learn more about the Paper book here
http://www.nauticed.org/sailing-blog/navigation-rules-hybrid-paperebook/

And one more place to get the International Rules is here as a eBook App for iPad.

FREE GUIDE:  Learn how to gain a sailing certification with NauticEd

How to ferry your boat into the dock

Posted by Director of Education on May 17, 2015 under Bareboat Charter, Crew, Maneuvering Under Power, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Ya gotta love this one. LIKE it on facebook please to spread the enLIKEnment.

Another Maneuvering technique for your bag of tricks.

This is a great trick we learned in the Bahamas last week when doing our ICC license with Mark Thompson from Yachting Education. Mark has been instructing students for 30 years and has an enormous bag of tricks to teach. This one was cool. South of the dock was a shallow area and so we could not drive up to the dock in a normal fashion. Instead we “ferryed” the boat across the wind.

Play the animation now.

This is just the one of the many tricks we have put into our Maneuvering and Docking a Sailboat Under Power Course.

maneuvering-under-power

NauticEd Maneuvering Under Power Course

Take the Maneuvering and Docking a Sailboat Under Power Course Now!

The Maneuvering under power course is a required course to gain the Skipper Rank.

Here’s the video

 

Posted on our facebook page  NauticEd – Online sailing courses on Tuesday, May 19, 2015

 

Master of the Vessel vs Crew

Posted by Director of Education on under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

Here is an excellent question from a student with our answer. It is in regards to entering Master of the vessel time into his NauticEd online sailing logbook.

>>>>>>>>>>>>

My name is Ben , and I am a NauticEd Member. I am quite fond of the program and think it is a wonderful tool for new sailors like me.

I do have one suggestion regarding the NauticEd Logbook however. Currently, you can only enter experience as master of the vessel or as crew. In my situation, I often find myself standing solo watches while sailing; while not master of the vessel, I am acting in a greater capacity than simple crew. I would suggest that you add a “watchstander” option for your logbook system so that sailors like me who aren’t often the final authority on board, but are acting in that capacity for 4 hours or more.

Thanks for your time, and keep up the good work.

Ben C
NauticEd Member

>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Our reply

Ben thanks for your excellent suggestion. I get what you are saying – there is a level of responsibility in Watchleader.

We’d have to think about how to incorporate this level of granularity into our online sailing logbook. In regards to the capacity of crew however it is worth still a full day so long as there is sufficient master time to match. e.g. if you have 10 days as master then you can earn all 10 crew days (if logged) towards level promotion. The only time crew days don’t really count is when there is a gross imbalance.

When working with charter companies they were very insistent on master of the vessel time and how important that was. We did put some provisions in there for instructor supervised time to short cut to level 1.

We’ll keep thinking as we always work to improve the whole concept. We also allow students to use seamanship discretion when deciding who was master of the vessel. e.g. when a student goes out with a friend and asks the friend that he needs master time – he can ask his friend “can he be designated today as master?” That kind of thing counts I believe and is valuable time.

Thanks

Grant

How to Gain a Sailing Certification

Posted by Director of Education on May 13, 2015 under About NauticEd, Bareboat Charter, Crew, Skipper | Comments are off for this article

I’ve just finished writing an eBook on How to Gain a Sailing Certification

The information comes from years of knowledge working with and interviewing yacht charter companies. The eBook is free to download.

Click on the image to download the eBook now.

How to Gain a Sailing Certification

How to Gain a Sailing Certification

The 5 most important questions answered

  • What is the difference between a sailing certification and a sailing resume?
  • How can I document my experience?
  • How do I sail in international waters, what is an ICC?
  • What will a yacht charter company accept and what will they turn away?
  • How can I get experience if I don’t own a boat?